The Colour of Mincemeat



If I didn't already have my dream job I would like to be the person who chooses the colour names for yarn. That's a job right? Someone gets to do it. Madelinetosh has an inspired namepicker. I'd much rather knit something in Stovepipe, Steam Age, Smokestack or Baltic than in grey or blue.


If I were in charge of the naming of yarns I would make sure there was a sock yarn called Mincemeat*. I think it would make fabulous socks. They'd be the perfect thing to knit at this time of year.


Alas I have no Mincemeat sock yarn, but I do have Tropical Fish sock yarn from Meadow Yarn. Now, where did I put my pointy sticks?


*It's Delia's recipe with apricots instead of currants, the addition of cherries and rum instead of brandy. Tomorrow is Stir Up Sunday. Time to make the Christmas Pud.

Comments

  1. Pretty yarn. I agree that mincemeat-hued yarn would be beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A friend hand dyes her yarn and the fun part is naming the colours. Anything with a foodie connection always seems to go down well.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just like the enticing of the imaginative names of Farrow & Ball paints...such as mouse's back and arsenic, Nancy's blushes and mole's breath. Mincemeat yarn would make up beautiful socks.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm glad they didn't ask me what I thought of British Christmas pudding or mince pies before handing me a British passport... they might have refused me!
    (My first Christmas here I couldn't understand why people would serve 'meat' at the end of a meal... I thought it bonkers)

    I do agree that it LOOKS good... and let's leave it at that...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I wish I could move to England. I'm the only one in my family who likes mincemeat and Christmas pudding. And I mean the entire, extended, family. Consequently, I don't generally get it at Christmas. Sigh. On another note, that yarn looks gorgeous! Can't wait to see the result, Sue.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I agree about the wonderful colours named by Madelinetosh. Composition book grey is one of my favourites. Your mincemeat sounds delicious, very luxurious I think, I love apricots and cherries. When I was little we always used to have a big mincemeat tart shaped like a Christmas tree with cherries on the end of every branch. Now I've remembered that I think I might make one this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a fabulous idea, I may have to steal it.

      Delete
  7. I completely agree with you about the beautifully evocative names some companies give to their yarns. Madelinetosh is a great example.

    Your mincemeat mix has truly beautiful colors...yes, perfect harmonies for a sock yarn. Your own chosen multi-color yarn skein looks rather good as well.

    Aren't colors a joy to play with? Thank your for your visit and comment. I am still in the very early stages of getting into the etsy mode.

    xo

    ReplyDelete
  8. When I see beautiful wool I long to knit and crochet but I know that myquilting takes every moment of my time.I use Delia's mincemeat recipe, have you tried adding fresh cranberries, I also make some with chopped figs.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great job to have - did you know David Cameron's wife has a job naming handbags for Mulberry? Mmm, that's exactly what I thought too!
    But yes, what a great thing to do, naming wool colours, and I think the colours in the mincemeat are like the colours you get when you gaze into a piece of Tweed and realise it isn't brown, but orange, and red, and black and oooh look a bit of purple.....and green.....

    ReplyDelete
  10. Oh yes, that would indeed be a fun job, and "mincemeat" yarn would be a gorgeous colour, I am sure. I've never made my own mincemeat, which is strange as I do love to make anything that can be stored in a jam jar. x

    ReplyDelete
  11. Apricots always beat currants hands down. Maybe I'll make just a few jars this year (despite the fossilising ones on the pantry shelf being testament to overproduction in the past). It's the smell I can't miss.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I definately think that mincemeat (colour!) would make great socks, and it is a great name too - so descriptive in just the right way! xx

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dear Sue. I have not blogged in a while. Long while. I need a change. I need a new template. I have been searching and searching your blog for THAT post where you talk about your template but alas, I cannot find it. Can you help me out? By the way, the mincemeat looks yum. I knew I was missing something throughout the last few months! Your lovely pictures. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Hazel, I don't remember talking about my template except to say that I'd changed it -it was September 2012 I think. The template is from Blog Milk. You can find a link to Blog Milk right at the bottom of the page underneath the little heart.

      Delete
    2. You might like Lou Archell's blog designs.

      Delete
  14. Anonymous11:32 am GMT

    Just wanted to say hurray for non flaky bloggers who still have integrity. Some (in my opinion) are letting it slip in a big way. It's good to know there are alternatives and that some people still value and honour core values. Thank you. (And not a single ad on the page or a money button - how do you do it - but yet that used to be the norm didn't it?)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I don't have ads or buttons because I'm very fussy about how my blog looks and I just don't like the way those things look. I'm not in it to make money or to become a big name in the blogging world, I just like to do my own thing. I'm happy if readers like what I do.

      Delete
  15. Dear Sue, I just googled Mincemeat after reading your post in order to find out how exactely it is served and eaten. I am still a bit confused. As dessert or as a pie filling? With whipped cream to accompany it? I have no idea :-)

    Whilst googling, I stumbled over the very interesting story of "Operation Mincemeat", which I had never heard of. The joys of the internet, I suppose :-) Thank you, by the way, for your lovely blog, which to me, a former Student of British Literature and Culture (and still ignorant about mincemeat, shame on me!) is so wonderfully British :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A pie filling primarily Anna. We usually put it in little pies about the size of a cupcake but it can also be used in bigger tarts or pies. I like to add it to apple crumbles and sometimes cakes (there's a recipe somewhere on this blog). It also makes a very good hot sauce for ice cream. If I'm serving mince pies hot I like to have whipped cream with them.

      It is called mince 'meat' because originally (centuries ago) it contained finely chopped meat as well as the sweet ingredients. The inclusion of suet is a reminder of the original meat.

      Delete
  16. I've just got rid of a stair carpet, the colour of which I always thought should be called Cat Litter (wet and dry....).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can see you have a talent for colour naming.

      Delete