Savoury Jellies






Not actually savoury at all. These jellies are just as sweet as the kind you spread on toast. They are savoury in their use. Herb jellies are good for serving alongside meat, for glazing meat to be grilled, adding to marinades or for stirring into gravy. Chilli jelly or chelly as we call it is excellent in a cheese sandwich, with sausages, or anywhere you might use commercial sweet chilli sauce.

To make my jellies I used my crab apples but cooking apples or any sharp eating apple will do. I picked about 4 lbs of crab apples, washed them, and chopped them roughly. I tipped them into a preserving pan and covered them with water -just to the top of the apples.


I then cooked the apples for about 40 minutes until they were completely soft and making the house heavenly. After leaving them to cool a little I put about half the apples into a jelly bag and let it drip for several hours before discarding the pulp* and putting the rest of them in to drip. By the next morning I had about 4 pints of pink juice.

The formula for jellies is 1 lb of sugar to every pint (2½ cups) of juice.

Chilli Jelly
I put 2 pints of juice in the preserving pan plus 2 lbs of granulated sugar and an almost full bag of frozen chillies. You can of course use fresh chillies but that's what I had on hand. I stirred everything over a low heat until the sugar had dissolved then I whacked up the heat, brought it to a rolling boil and boiled for about 8 minutes. It set really well, not too stiffly but not at all runny either and the heat level was just right -hot but not incendiary. I potted it into 3 sterilised jars.

Herb Jellies
For the mint jelly I used 1 pint of juice plus 1 lb of sugar and a large handful of chopped mint (which grows underneath my crab apple tree) and made it in exactly the same way as the chilli jelly.
I used the last pint and another lb of sugar plus a large handful of sage (also growing under the crab apple tree) to make sage jelly.
I got two small jars of mint jelly and two small jars of sage jelly.

Rosemary, thyme and tarragon are other possibilities.

If I'd had more apples I would have cooked and strained them and frozen the juice in 1 pint portions to make into jellies another day.

So, that's number 2 I can cross off my September to-do list. I'm well on my way to crossing off number 5 too.

*The pulp can be used to make another preserve -apple cheese. I haven't tried this but there are plenty of recipes around the internet.

Comments

  1. Wonderful, wonderful. I do like it when you make things such as these that are so far out of my league that I can feel admiring rather than inadequate. A bit like appreciating a particularly good stained glass window.

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  2. Go on, show us the shawl! How much have you done?

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    1. Patience! Won't be long now, I've been knitting all day.

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  3. Really wonderful, clear instructions. My local park has lovely crabs. I may forage for some and make these. The colour of the Chelly is stunning.

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  4. Wow, you have been busy with those crab apples. I am very impressed. Can you use "normal" apples in the same way or don't they have enough pectin to make it set?

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    1. Second paragraph ;-)

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    2. Ah! I wasn't sure if it needed to be a cooking rather than eating apple when I asked, but I see you already had the answer. Thanks

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  5. I have never made a jelly of any kind - I am quite scared of them to be honest - but you've demystified the process beautifully. Yours look and sound delicious and I do like the way you do your labels, with those little line drawings. x

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  6. They look delicious. I like sweet chili sauce for dipping shrimp or cold Vietnamese spring rolls, I think your chelly would be good for that too.

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  7. Beautiful photographs. And maybe an idea for what to do with all of the chillies I have rashly grown. Not sure what I was thinking.

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  8. Mmmm. They all look and sound so good. I am awaiting samples of all the jellies and jams my Mum makes. I think I will have to tell her about your Chelly recipe as a none too subtle hint if you don't mind.

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  9. Yum and yum again, Sue. These jars seem to be full of wonderful treasure.

    When I visited the big Union Sq. Farmers Market this week and saw some crab apples, I did think of you.

    What September progress you are making. (On my much more modest list, I have gotten the weekly laundry done, moved my Mighty Mite vacuum cleaner around the apartment, seen some dear friends for coffees, worked a few days ... and will be working this weekend, written several times to our President, my Senators and Congressional Representative re my thoughts re any Syrian military intervention not being wise, and finished knitting and blocking two scarves, started a new one, and almost finishing some fingerless mitts. Oh...I also watched some of the U.S. Open Tennis.

    More happened, as it does, but I'll keep it to myself.

    How I do enjoy visiting your site, Sue. xo

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  10. Anonymous3:26 am BST

    My mother used to be a great jelly and jam maker. I remember being totally put off, as a kid, by the idea of chelly (she caller it Pepper Jelly). She'd have it on crackers with cream cheese. A mouse once got into it (paraffin sealed) and was found feet up next to the jar. Ha. There you go. Proof.
    Now that I'm older and wiser, I can imagine it might be quite good and may have to try it. If nothing else, it is quite beautiful to gaze at.

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  11. The colours are just superb and very inviting. makes me want to make some!

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  12. Hi Sue, I have been quietly enjoying your blog for a few months now and just wanted to say thanks so much for that lovely recipe! So beautiful and as for the chelly-perfect for Christmas pressies. I'm off to re-find the crab apple I discovered last year. X

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  13. Grrr! I was going to make some jellies today as it was supposed to rain but it's sunny! Not sure what to do now! Thanks for sharing the recipes - I will give them a try! x

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  14. The colours in the food photos you've been posting are really vivid and lovely. The damson puree looks delightful, and I've always fancied trying savoury jelly.

    We're trying to do home-made gifts this Christmas and I think I know someone who would love some of that chelly :)

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  15. I see a walk to the crab apple tree in my future x

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  16. I was so pleased to read your formula for jellies. Thank you. Will try that.

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