The Wrong Flowers


Farewell and adieu to you fair Spanish bluebells,
Farewell and adieu to you bluebells of Spain,
For you are not what I ordered which were sweet woodland bluebells
And I hope to replace you as soon as I can.
(To be sung to this tune)

Not what I had in mind

My supplier is very sorry and is sending me 100 native British woodland bluebells (hyacinthoides non-scripta)'in the green'.
All well and good but it means I have to plant them and I'm someone who loves gardens but hates gardening. Pulling up the Spaniards has wiped me out for the day.


But there are compensations.


To my Spanish readers
Please be assured that is only Spanish bluebells I dislike and not Spanish people :o)

Comments

  1. The Spanish bluebells proliferate all over our area of West London (and perhaps all over the UK?) I need to do some serious culling as they are taking over my garden. Good for you insisting on the real McCoy.

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  2. Didn't realise they were different, but these are the bluebells I see everywhere! Is it like the red squirrel and a usurper has come along and taken over? They are still beautiful though, and good luck with your True Blue ones! Have a lovely weekend, Claire xxx

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    Replies
    1. They are different in several ways, but the main difference is in colour. Spanish bluebells are considerably paler than true wild bluebells. It's the deep indigo blue I'm after.

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  3. Anna King7:55 pm BST

    I adore the photos - especially the last one. Your garden looks lovely too. I also didn't realise that there are different types of bluebells, I will look closely from now on. x

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  4. Glad you insisted on "real English Bluebells"! I have English Bluebells in my garden and look forward every year to seeing them pop their heads up. They were in the garden before we moved in and no-one is allowed to cut the grass in the area they are in until they have finished flowering.
    Julie xxxxxxxx

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  5. I'm lucky to have a wood not far away that's furnished with a carpet of proper English (well Welsh) bluebells every spring. Bluebells, wild garlic, and boggy bit this year. Like you I love gardens more than gardening and the native flower more than the interloper.

    Brilliant video clip, Richard Dreyfuss looks sooooo young, was Jaws really that long ago?! Can you believe I've never seen the movie. My Mum wouldn't let me go to see it in the cinema, too violent! And somehow I've never got around to it since.

    Enjoy your jug of beautiful compensations :D

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    Replies
    1. We have bluebell woods very near too, but I want to be able to pick some legally.

      I love Jaws, one of my favourite films, and not really violent by today's standards. Such a good script.

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  6. Good luck with removing the Spanish variety - you may find they come up year after year as the bulbs pull themselves down to Australia! Apparently they are crossing with our native bluebells and reducing the population - an awful pity as the woodland natives are a much daintier plant producing that unmatchable unique blue haze

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    1. Oh lord I hope not. I only planted them in September. They came up pretty easily.

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  7. How I agree about loathing gardening. Outdoor housework that needs doing again and again! I'd be very pleased to have bluebells, though I agree the English ones are prettier.

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  8. Pati from London8:39 pm BST

    I have loads of those it my front garden but didn't know they were my "comrades".... It's funny because my mum is here visiting from Spain and loves them but a couple of days ago she was telling me she couldn't find them in Spain (00hh!!! What a funny world, isn't it??). x Pati

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    1. Oh the irony! They're pretty flowers but not what I ordered.

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  9. Granny Dot10:26 pm BST

    The Spanish bluebell thugs are soooo hard to get rid of. I've been digging them out of my garden for the past 30 years. The leaves and flower stalks come away easily but the bulbs grow deep and split very easily. True, the flowers are pretty but Spanish bluebells grow up through almost anything and they spread maddeningly. Perhaps I should give in and turn the garden into a bluebell meadow? Gardening seems to be a combination of (a few) thrills and (many, many) spills. Here's hoping your little blighters haven't been in long enough to have dug deep.

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  10. I do hope that they haven't gone really deep and left bulbils down there to pop up when you least expect them. Mine are the Spanish variety and have been in the earth for a lot of years, so I doubt that I could eradicate them totally. As to colour, mine this year, are a deep, deep blue and very, very tall!

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  11. Hello! M sister put me on to your blog, which we both love. Funny, this song made me think not of Jaws but of Swallows and Amazons!

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