All the Books

Tuesday, 22 September 2015







You might remember my reading challenge from this post back in January. It's no great surprise to me that many remain unread. I am very bad at sticking to challenges of any kind. That said I still intend to read those books some day. The thing is though, my To Be Read list is even longer now. Just lately the urge to read the classics has come over me and I find myself daily adding to my Amazon wishlist and planning where I can squeeze another bookshelf.

I read a fair few classics when I was doing my A levels and my degree but there are great gaps in my reading which I'd like to fill. Recent reads have been Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell and Wuthering Heights. All completely unlike each other and all very enjoyable. But there are so many more wonderful classics waiting for me and thanks to publishers like Vintage and imprints like Penguin English Library and Penguin Modern Classics there are beautiful, stylish paperback editions of classic literature perfect for someone like me who judges a book by its cover and who has never seen the attraction of an e-reader.

I especially like these Vintage editions of Dickens and have begun to work my way through him beginning with his first novel The Pickwick Papers which I am finding hilarious.




24 comments:

  1. Anonymous6:02 pm BST

    Always interested to see what other people read. It is usually gardening books. I do also like to read books about gardeners as well. Linda

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  2. I love the attractive new editions too -- hankering after all those Vintage covers! Hope you enjoy your classics reading.

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  3. Yes! to everything you just said.

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  4. Love those selections and editions. Miss Buncle's Book is on my wish list, it looks so clever. I am reading Orley Farm by Anthony Trollope and loving it.

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  5. They look so much more tempting than my shelf of battered Oxfam finds.

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  6. Wonderful and such beautiful books. I finished Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day and just loved it. Also, The Four Graces by D.E. Stevenson. Waiting in the wings for me is Dorothy Whipple's Someone At A Distance. I have shelved Hardy as I find his fiction quite depressing..may have to try again. Thank you.

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  7. That's a very appealing selection you've got there, Sue!

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  8. Lovely books to read there. I love Miss Buncle's book - really funny and clever. Someone at a distance is really good too, though quite thought provoking and one which has stayed with me. Ellen said she found Hardy too depressing - try Under the Greenwood Tree which is light and as far as I can remember, no-one dies! I have to read Dickens in the Autumn and Winter so it is time to pick up another, I think!
    Best wishes and happy reading
    Ellie

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    1. P.S I have just finished the Barchester Chronicles - did you hear the Radio 4 productions on a Sunday afternoon? I really enjoyed them and thought Trollope worked so well on the radio.
      Best wishes
      Ellie

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    2. I missed the most recent ones but have an older version with Alec McCowen an on audio which is wonderful.

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  9. Winding Ways8:17 pm BST

    I get most of my books from the public library - much cheaper and less dusting! Dickens is a favorite, though, one I have to re-read periodically, so I've got editions of all his books. William Heinesen's _The Lost Musicians_ is another book that I go to again and again.

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  10. I love what I've read of Dickens (which isn't much), and I'd love to read it all. Very funny as you say. I remember Treasure Island very vividly from childhood, the horrors of Blind Pugh thump-thumping along the corridor. I have I Capture The Castle on the shelf to read. I'm wondering if I could read it to the boys or whether it's too girly? CJ xx

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    1. Well if my boys are anything to go by I'd say no, but they are insensitive louts.

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  11. I too judge a book by its cover. I remember the huge effort that went into the design, typefaces, artwork and back cover blurb. It would be rude not to. Hardly any Persephone books fail the endpaper and bookmark test. So clever of them.

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  12. I know what you mean about the classics. I read more &more of them & although I do love the convenience of my ereader for the more obscure titles, there's nothing like a nice new Penguin or OUP edition with notes & Introduction. I'm also very bad at challenges, especially the ones I set myself, so I almost never start them! I'm glad you're enjoying Pickwick. Imwas surprised how much I loved it when I read it a few years ago. I'm listening to Dombey on audio for the first time in 30 years, & I'm loving it.

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    1. Dickens is great on audio isn't he?

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    2. In particular, Bleak House.

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  13. Welcome back Sue . Thank you for the link to Furrowed Middlebrow - what a treasure trove!

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  14. I read Pride and Prejudice for the first time ever this summer and LOVED it! Pati x

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  15. I love the classics, too. I've just reread Madame Bovary, but it was on my Kindle, I'm afraid. I love paper books, and have shelves and shelves at home, but I commute on the train, and I have to drag my laptop in and out every day, and trying to carry a proper book too - too big, too heavy! Especially if it's something like The Twelve by Justin Cronin which was huge. Plus, I can read my Kindle one-handed whilst standing on the Tube, and I can't do that with a paperback.

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  16. I love reading the classics. I do it in fits and starts. I don't have any sort of e-reader and just enjoy a real book.

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  17. Just mentioning Edith Wharton here, as I thoroughly enjoy most of her books. For me, so far, the Persephones haven't been quite, quite as lovely as their covers - they always seem to top my B-list rather than go on my A-list. Perhaps I have chosen the wrong ones.

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  18. I recently read two of Barbara Comyns books and prior to that a lot of E M Delafield; E H Young is another favourite as is Monica Dickens (I prefer her to Charles). There are new editions of Richmal Cromptons adult fiction but I can't recall who is publishing them. She was an extremely engaging writer.

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  19. Mis Buncle is on my "to read" pile as well - I love Persephone Books, both for reading and aesthetic pleasure and am looking forward to the latest RC Sherriff - I have read The Hopkins Manuscript and The Fortnight in September, both of which I loved. And I spot JL Carr's A Month in the Country among your stash. That may well be my favourite book of all time - I re-read it frequently - for such a slim volume it packs a real punch.

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