Fridge Jam

Saturday, 6 September 2014

If you like the idea of making jam but think you need lots of time, lots of specialist equipment and lots of fruit then fridge jam could be just what you've been looking for.


Nancy made some blackcurrant fridge jam and it looked so good and sounded so easy I just had to make some too. I made mine with blackberries from my garden which I'd been picking every few days and stashing in my freezer. All berries and stone fruits will work in a fridge jam, even those bags of frozen fruits of the forest will work. Experiment!




You can make it with the smallest amount of fruit, Nancy made hers with half a punnet of blackcurrants, I made mine with  1lb 6oz (610g) of blackberries. You don't need a special pan for such a small amount, a saucepan will do but make sure it has a fairly thick bottom. You don't need to sterilise jars because this isn't designed for long term storage and although it has less sugar than conventional jam it still has enough to keep the jam for some time. You don't even need to keep your jam in a jar, a plastic tub will do just as well or you could just keep it in a bowl. You can even freeze it.


All you do is weigh your fruit and weigh out half as much sugar throw both in a saucepan, add a couple of spoonfuls of water just to stop it burning and heat. Once the fruit has released lots of juice and the sugar has dissolved into the fruit bring the jam to the boil and boil fast for 5-10 minutes. Then pour into a jar (if you are using plastic containers obviously wait until it has cooled).

I used ordinary granulated sugar but if you use jam sugar (sugar with pectin added) you will get a better set.  Jam sugar is more expensive though and I still got a nice syrupy jam. It was quite runny and more like stewed fruit when hot but it thickened and gelled considerably in the fridge.


As Nancy says fridge jam falls somewhere between stewed fruit and proper jam and because of this it is incredibly versatile. You can use it like jam dolloped on toast or scones, but you can also stir it into yogurt, fold it into whipped cream for a fool. Heat it and pour onto vanilla ice cream, spoon it onto rice pudding or porridge, use it to fill a pancake or a sponge cake, stir it into apples for a pie, crumble or cobbler, you get the idea. It's also delicious eaten on its own.

The great thing about fridge jam apart from how easy it is to make is that when you eat it you feel like you are eating fruit rather than sugar. It's sweet, certainly but intensely fruity as well and when I say that toast and fridge jam counts as one of your five a day I'm not joking.






21 comments:

  1. Anonymous3:10 pm BST

    wow! I think even I could make this,off to find some blackcurrants immediately.You are a great fountain of knowledge Sue

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looks absolutely delicious. I use to make peach jam, but got tired of how much work it was. Would this process work for peaches as well as berries?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I should think it would work beautifully.

      Delete
  3. Fabulous! Have made cherry fridge jam before; it doesn't hang around long enough to go off. Planning to make some blackberry jam now and freeze (good idea), perfect to bring out in the depths of winter sliding about on crumpets.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for posting this it looks really good, I like the idea that you can use small amounts of fruit

    ReplyDelete
  5. A great idea. I must admit that I love making jam. I am a new to it, but find the whole process so relaxing and mindful.
    Leanne xx

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow. This might actually accomplish the impossible task of getting me to make jam. We have cherry, apricot, and plum trees, and this would give us another thing to do with the fruit. Especially if this jam counts as one of my five a day! :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. It's a great idea, it sounds delicious. I made a small amount of plum jam today with some left over plums (600g). It's utterly divine, I'd completely forgotten how good plum jam is. Another jar and a half for winter.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You got me at yoghurt, lol! Am trying to get away from shop bought flavored yoghurts, had some homemade elderberry jelly from the farmers' market on plain Greek and it was wonderful. Do wish blackcurrants were popular in the US, sigh

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret12:47 pm GMT

      Can you grow some? Blackcurrants are not hard to grow (over here at least) - maybe depends on your particular climate tho. But one or two bushes would be enough to get some wonderful jam, my absolute favourite although damson is a close second...

      Delete
  9. You can even make it in a microwave! Perfect for students!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Looks good to me, especially as you don't have to sterilise the jars. I just made blackberry jelly but the jelly bag slipped so I now have a purple work top, shirt and floor and far fewer jars of jelly than I'd planned. Wish I'd read this earlier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no! I feel your pain, it's happened to me too although not so purple.

      Delete
  11. I must give this a go. I went through a phase of making jam out of every fruit I had available. Lots and lots of jam that still isn't quite finished. When it is, I'll make fridge jam that will be eaten up quickly and then I'll make more. I like the fact that there's a lot less sugar in it.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This sounds just the ticket - just a quick question - once you've boiled it for 15 minutes do you need to do the cold plate test or the dripping off the wooden spoon test? Cheers! Lx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't bother Lynne because it doesn't really need to set as much as a proper jam. You're aiming for syrupy rather than set.

      Delete
  13. Anonymous7:01 pm BST

    I made some blackberry jam with the zest and juice of limes - helps it to set a bit and gives a lovely tang Anne-Marie

    ReplyDelete
  14. How handy that you can quickly make a small batch without a fuss and lots of equipment.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Sue, you such an inspiration! I think that I might just be able to manage making this in my tiny kitchen. Next farmers market visit will be Wednesday. I promise to tell you what I manage to create.

    Many thanks. xo

    ReplyDelete
  16. Success! One little bag of damsons left at a stall on a country lane, fridge jam cooling exactly one hour later! First tasting - delicious. Thanks, Sue.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Margaret12:51 pm GMT

    I love this easy jam method! Could add that I usually just boil some water in my jar for about 5 mins in the microwave while the jam is cooking - no fuss, nice and clean. (Also, made some more traditional sugary jam with my daughter which she rejected as too sweet! Good girl!)

    ReplyDelete

The Quince Tree All rights reserved © Blog Milk - Powered by Blogger