Knit Kit

Tuesday, 25 March 2014

 Non knitters might assume that all you need to knit are sticks and yarn. That's true up to a point but when I decided to become a proper knitter last year I discovered that there are several other items necessary to knitting happiness. I realised I would need some sort of container in which to keep those items, something that could be thrown into my knitting bag and which would open easily and allow me to find what I needed without having to turn the entire contents out first.


This tin was perfect. It is 13cm by 20cm and 4cm deep. It's one of four in a set


It is the perfect size to hold all my kit which consists of;

A tape measure
A row counter. This Clover row counter is much easier to use than ones which fit on the end of your knitting needle.
A Grössenskala von Stricknadeln or, as I like to call it, a needle gauge.
Scissors
Crochet hook for fixing dropped stitches
darning needles (in the green bullet) for sewing in ends
Thin thread for lifelines (useful when you are knitting a lace pattern)
Lots of stitch markers
Small tin to keep stitch markers in to stop them messing up the rest of my stuff
A set of dpns (because I am going to make some socks soon)
Instructions for Kitchener stitch (because there is no way I will ever commit it to memory)
Leftover yarn (not essential at all)

In my knitting bag I have my yarn and needles, the pattern I'm following and a small notebook and pen although I think these last two could also go in my tin.
What do you have in your knit kit? Is there anything vital I have forgotten?


Yarn for the socks I am going to make soon. Two pairs.

40 comments:

  1. Looks good! I know what you mean about Kitchener stitch, I always need to check the instructions beforehand, as I never remember the order the stitches all go in.

    Love the sock yarn, beautiful!

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  2. Having worked in a craft shop for seven years, I think you have everything you need if I remember correctly (haven't worked for two years) Stitch Holder, Cable Needle, but a sock needle will do the same job. I have a ruler and needle gauge in one they are about 6"long. Also if you are making jumpers there are special pins which a have a flat head either a star shape made of paper, or plastic hearts.
    Julie

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  3. I am with you with the Kitchener stitch, I will never remember it. I don't have a handy small knit kit but carry most of the above in a small drawstring bag, which is very unorganised of me and often, the yarn gets tangled up with other bits and pieces. I do have a big wooden stay at home box (it used to contain my grandfather's military bits and bobs I think) with needles and all the other fancies a knitter could wish for. The sock yarn is delightful, is it Trailing Clouds?

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    1. The yarn is Koigu Painter's Palette.

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  4. Replies
    1. I knew there was something.

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  5. I was surprised to find out how much more kit I needed to knit than I did for crochet, hook and yarn is about it and it didn't matter what sort of hook. But my knitting kit is full of a whole variety needles and now quite a few circulars, nearly all bamboo - I prefer their quietness. Crochet hooks are essential to my knitting for the reason you write too, plus paper and pencil for keeping a check on where I am, maybe I'll look at that counter.

    Looking forward to seeing how that yarn stripes.

    I find knitting is so very much - more- than crochet....just love it.

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    1. Yes! So many more needles. I've had a set of ordinary knitting needles for years which I've never used. When I took up knitting I thought I was well equipped but no, I had to buy a different length and size circular needle for nearly every project, and dpns for socks. I think I'm fully kitted up now though.

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  6. My knitting "box of useful", as I call it, contains almost the same things as your Knit Kit. It doesn't have the Kitchener stitch instructions. It does also have a set of cable needles, an ordinary pen, and a highlighter pen. Also a few odds and ends like stray buttons, extra row counters, two or three sets of tips and cable-enders for circular needles, and a safety pin or two.

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  7. Two things I would recommend are a highlighter pen for marking which size you're working on, when you have a pattern that has multiple sizes. Also, some cotton waste yarn which can be used for holding stitches, for provisional cast-on, and for a lifeline. But I think your idea of using a tin is brilliant. I'm always digging around in my pouch because whatever I want has always fallen to the bottom, underneath everything else. I'm now going to go find myself a tin.

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  8. Good luck with the socks, Sue! (Looking forward to seeing them.)

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  9. I knit my first couple of pairs of socks on DPNs, but I'm now trying Melissa Morgan-Oakes 2 at a time on one circular needle - toe up (so at the end of it I will have a complete pair with no Kitchener stitching).

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  10. What a great idea (but can you enlighten me on the Kitchener stitch instructions - when do you use them - not heard of them before??)

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    1. Kitchener stitch is a method of grafting two pieces of 'live' knitting together invisibly such as the toe of a sock. You use a darning needle to do it and it replicates stocking stitch. If you google it you will find many pictures and videos explaining it.

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    2. Ah thank you x

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  11. Ooh! I love your tin, and especially the green bullet. I dread to think how many darning needles are lurking down the back of our sofa... :(

    My 'crochet kit' has been growing and growing for years, so that now it actually occupies a whole room (mainly for the yarn). However, on the move, I can fit it all in a skinny pencil case - hooks, darning needle, scissors (which are on a mini penknife) and a couple of stitch markers (somehow less necessary for crochet). The project itself is usually lurking in my handbag. Praise be for large handbags!

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  12. Oh my! I just had a wake up moment when I saw that counter! I have been working on something that has over 230 rows and after each row I have been writing the row and the stitch count. But a counter--ooo. Where have I been?!

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  13. Sue, this post is so much fun...I also love all the prior comments!

    Before I even begin to comment on the knit kit concept, I want to tell you how beautiful that Koigu yarn is. I have never regretted buying any Koigu yarn. A famed NYC yarn shop, Purl SoHo, is located near my own workplace. They stock a lot of Koigu. It is dangerous for me to take a "quick look" around Purl, trying not to be snagged at the Koigu area.

    Now. On to your kit. You've got such an organized kit. It's so different from my decades old accumulation of various knitting tools and accessories. When I have a mobile knitting project, I usually just take it along in my gigantic shoulder bag, encased in its own ziplock plastic bag. There would be the yarn, the needles, some post-it slips from Muji and perhaps some scribbled notes about the pattern or design. I just use odd little knotted loops of yarn in contrasting colors for my markers.

    All those other useful things, like measuring tape, immense and growing collection of needles (straight in several lengths, circular, double points,) scissors, sewing needles, stitch-counter, stay at home. When I am working on something new or very complicated, I usually find it easier to use paper and pen to keep count of rows, together with those Muji post-its. I've got some little scissors, but also like to use little Japanese snips.

    I could go on, but think this might already be verging on way too much info.

    xo

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    1. Little bits of yarn for stitch markers is a such a good idea. I do love the little beaded ones you can get from Etsy and such -they're like pretty earrings.

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  14. A few weeks ago, I fell for a pack of (bought!) socks - navy stripes, red stripes, little anchors etc. - all very jolly. I wore the first pair under walking boots and they were hell! Next day, I had a ridge of bruises on top of my toes; I looked at the socks and they had prominent seams connecting the toes to the top of the sock - and then I remembered General Kitchener!! Three cheers for Kitchener stitch!!

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  15. I won't tell you everything I have in my knit kit, suffice to say, it wouldn't fit in that tin! I think your version is better though.

    S x

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  16. Pretty much the same but currently thrown into a large carrier bag! Not good. Time I made myself a new knitting bag & invested in a tin x

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  17. Your new yarn is lovely and will make great socks I'm sure. You are so organised having everything in one tin, I really must get my things organised, they seem to be hither and yon some in my sewing box, some things in my crochet basket and others in my yarn box!! Not a good look really. Thanks for the inspiration Sue. xx

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  18. I do a three needle bind- off as my K stitch is so crappy. Love the tin but prefer a basket, less clattery and Koigu PP is SO nice and springy...........

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    1. I've just learnt how to do a 3 needle bind off - the neck of my shawl was finished that way. It didn't occur to me that it could be used for sock toes. Thanks!

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  19. Hip flask! Knitting drives me to gin. However in my crochet bag I have similar plus some large glass headed pins. I also have some luggage labels, as I tend to move from one project to another leaving it half done I write all the essential info like hook size etc on the tag and tie it to the project! I've been inspired to move it all to a very pretty empty tin.

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  20. I always have the yarn for the Next Project. Because, you know, I don't want to get caught short.

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  21. I do like nice tins to keep treasures in, yours is lovely. I love your stitch counter, I can never find my little end of needle ones when I need them, and they don't fit on to the big needles either. I have a couple of stitch holders in my knitting bag - kind of like giant safety pins. They're useful sometimes.

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  22. Toe up sock pattern - no more Kitchener stitch. Yay!
    …and of course… chocolate ;-)

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  23. I don't know where I read it but it has saved my life on Kitchener stitch. When your sewing needle is pointing towards the middle. slip the stitch off the knitting needle. When it's pointing away from the middle, leave it on. Works for both back and front set of stitches

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  24. I have a very similar list of knitting requirements, but not so organised into a handy little tin. The clover stitch counter was my best ever knitting buy bar none. And I always need a pencil for marking where I am in the pattern, or if I have made any changes so I remember to do the same on the other side.

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  25. Purlrose7:01 pm GMT

    Lovely kit! I'm glad the knitting thing is going so well.

    The only extra in mine, is a number of safety pins. I use them to keep track of rows because I never reliably remember to move on a row counter or mark the pattern. A pin through some purl bumps of the row with shaping or cables, makes it easy to see when you have got to the next 6th row or wherever to do more. The pin then gets moved up. I also put them in every 10th row to keep track of rows when any part of a pattern is done twice and needs to match. With the aid of pins and stitch markers, the time I spend counting has hugely reduced.

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  26. I love the tin and the yarn is yummy!! Look forward to seeing the socks you make with it, Pati x

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  27. Interesting post, I have been knitting for more than fifty years but I don't have kit of any kind. I must have one and soon!

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  28. Lovely. I've got a little hand made zipped purse with my knitting kit in it. It contains exactly the same as yours with the exception of my knitting needle gauge, for some reason that's upstairs so I'll have to rectify that! I almost bought that row counter but I don't believe you can lock it to stop the numbers accidentally increasing if you're on the go with your knitting, so I bought another Clover one instead. I've joined Sock Knitter Anonymous and 12Socks in 2014 on Ravelry with the goal of knitting 12 pairs this year. The inspiration and motivation have been really good for me and I'm currently working on pair number five.

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  29. Anonymous12:41 pm BST

    The things you will always! need are in there. My "Bullit" with the lovely bent-tip darning needles has now a big crack just under the screwy thread which takes the top bit, just cracked from using so much. I do not do Kitchener stitch on socks (on straight pieces I can do it very well) I prefer the three needle bind off. Mind you, we knitting learning 9 year olds (of course I had learned at home two years earlier, kniiting family) were taught it with the sock turned inside out, we knit socks on four (or 5) needles, If you keep half the bind off stitches on one needle and divert the rest over two needles, the sock will turn through that hole between the needles easy, With the inside out you do the bind off and your sock will look perfect on the outside, Indeed, the seam on top of the start of your toes makes for blisters very fast.
    If I were (all of your followers) you, I would include a flat box of flossthread, the one with a cutter for it attached to it. Why? It is fabulous as a lifeline, pulls out very easy and you will always recognise it, even in white knitwork. Besides, when your lifeline yarn is not in use, it is all nicely packed away in its own little box and in knitting the next row you are not likely to pierce this lifeline with the pointed tip of a lace needle. DM

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  30. This is great Sue. I can never find what I need, and all these little items could be in any number of spots around the house. I usually throw some scissors in my bag and then stab myself rummaging around for them. And yes, I'm always pulling up a youtube tutorial for kitchener stitch, it's a really good idea to write it down like this :-)

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  31. I have a little pouch where I keep all the essentials... (socks eh? can't wait to see them!)

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  32. A row counter - I didn't know there was such a thing. That would save me scrawling all over my patterns in pencil!

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  33. Oh I do so love your yarn. The socks will look beautiful. I would love to knit but need to concentrate completely on the task in hand , so it's not a relaxing deed and I can't keep up a conversation .
    I stumbled on your blog and commend you on your photography ....will be back to browse some more.
    Alexa in Sydney, Australia blogging at http://www.Alexa-asimplelife.com

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