Ingredients For A Sunday

1. Sunshine and flowers. Lots of both.*





2. Gin and tonic. Just one.


3. Roast chicken. Two if you have teenage boys.


4. Bread and butter pudding.


5. England v Wales at Twickenham. It's an important match. May the best team win. As long as it's England! Scotland, you were robbed yesterday.

* If you look at this post from 21st March 2012 you will see spring is twelve days earlier this year.

Comments

  1. Here it's sunshine, flowers, perry, spring lamb (for the non veggies among us), home made chocolate ice cream, and a difficult choice as we're English but we live in the land of the red dragon!

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    1. Well it's 20-9 to England at the moment Annie, so if I were you I'd back the winning side :)

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  2. I'll forgive you the comment about scotland... mmmhhhh

    What do you mean two roast chickens??? is that my future?

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    1. It is your future for sure. Scotland were playing France yesterday not Italy.

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  3. England won, but close. I wish you wouldn't post photographs of drool worthy bread and butter pudding when I have just resolved to be serious about cutting back on the carbs and sugar.......

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    1. Was it close? Seemed like Wales got a thumping to me.

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    2. I misheard! Thought it was 20 -18, not 29 (or there a bouts) 15! I was listening from my sewing room. Funnily enough I never mind England being beaten by Wales, Ireland or Italy (Gotta love their national anthem!) but if they are playing Scotland or France - I can't watch!

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  4. Those ingredients, plus a bike ride, make a superb Sunday; well done England.

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  5. there is no blossom here - perils of the frozen north..... and no gin and tonic (yet) but there is a chicken casserole bubbling on the hob, and the teenage boy is repeatedly asking when it will be ready.

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  6. Your forsythia is earlier than mine. And I am waiting on the Roast Pork for dinner (there is no pud). We can call it celebration pork now the rugby is over. Is it too early for a G&T I wonder...

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  7. Sue - wow, beautiful BEAUTIFUL images of the blossom. Spring is so much earlier this year and it's wonderful. I really hope it doesn't get dramatically cold again, that would be so depressing! We had snow at the end of March last year, fingers crossed this year is milder. x

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  8. Anonymous6:50 pm GMT

    I am so jealous of your beautiful blossoms. We have nothing yet (US east coast), and still piles of snow about from a miserable winter. I have been going out every day shoveling snow onto the dry and clear driveway to help it melt, hoping the sun will warm the spring bulbs still huddling underground. Last year this time we looked as colorful as you. I am enjoying your Spring vicariously, wishing there was a chicken in my oven and some of that bread and butter pudding. Thanks for a peek at your Spring.

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  9. Bliss - so nice to see blue sky, flowers, the beginning of spring and sunshine.

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  10. Well, that sure is the antithesis of a perfect english Sunday from start to finish! Such jolly pictures, spring does seem to have sprung, hooray!
    Katie

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  11. One gin sounds very restrained for a beautiful spring Sunday. All in all a very good day I think though. I could happily eat a big bowl of that bread and butter pudding right now. I haven't quite got into the swing of Lent yet. It takes a while for me to stop craving sweet things.

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    1. Well...I did have another g&t later....

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  12. I love this first plant, but i have not yet been able to find out its name... Spring is early too, but not that much here...

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    1. It's called forsythia Stephanie.

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  13. Anonymous9:57 am GMT

    I wandered lonely as a cloud, we had to learn it for our diminished high school exams and I loved every word of it, but Milne's is also very beautiful and would have be welcomed by the majority of my schoolmates, that to yesterday's post. Winter is hopefully dead, because over here in the Netherlands we had temps of 20C, above zero I mean, could have been below too, but not this year. I am going to plant 4 varieties of strawberry in an open cold frame, sheltered from cold and harrasing winds, one variety is honey, the other pineapple, two plants each, because I have not much garden, we call it stampsize. Avbut the teenage boys and chickens, if your oven is large enough, get two! Römertopf pots or chickenbricks, I think they are also called,. You can leave the skin and fatty parts on, it will cook fat out totally, the skin getting easy to pull off and can be grilled for the extra crispy lovers. I put the pots small part down, lid reversed in a BUCKET each of lukewarm water for 10 minutes, then put the prepared (seasoned , stuffed) chicken in, set the oven and when the cooking time is complete less 5 minutes, take off the lids. Chicken ready for consuming and tender. Immediately after taking out of the oven put pots on trays to protect the table from heat and use thick potholders take out the chicken/meat, because otherrwise the juices leak out into the cooked out fat and the meat will be less tender. Often I take out chicken number two from the pot, only to see two legs of chicken disappear from the plate, the first one is then already legless. Boys will be boys, don't matter their age. There are many recipes on the net and the pots (claypots? in America?) are here appearing in numbers in thriftshops, spic and span and new, maybe in long lost times given as a present and never used. It makes sense to reserve one (or two) for meat and chicken and another one for sweet meals, like bread pudding etc. I know where a small quince tree is in a garden and I am watching out for the flowers to come. Never mind gin and tonic, I go for a small glass (ginsized, about 50 cc) of quince liquer and in daytimes from the start of february, for a large glass of elderflowerlimonade, to accustome my body to pollen. If it does not help, it surely tastes good. Come winter i will change to elderberry limonade, see, eldertrees are usefull too, they protect from lightning and witches (wish it were true) and they protect from mosquito like insects and that is true, they were over here (Netherlands) always planted in front of milkcellar windows which would be barred with iron stalks but open in summer, surely kept flies and the likes away, they do not like the smell of the wood. i will keep reading your blog, between you, gardeners world and country file I will keep upn to date with what happens gardenwise on the other side of the water. Reina

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  14. So lovely to see your forsythia, ours has produced only one flower this year, which was the beginning of the end last year for our other one, one flower and then it upped and died, so I fear that the other is following suit this year. It is great to see your flowers as I am really missing them! xx

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  15. Gin is about the only alcohol I can do without. Good on you for being so stoical in the face of it.

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    1. One has to set an example.

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