Flood

Monday, 10 February 2014

Worcester is, apparently, under siege according to the BBC. Of course it isn't. It is pretty wet though and some of the roads through the city centre are closed. We are fortunate to live on the northern outskirts of Worcester well away from the river on high ground. It can't be much fun to live near the river at the moment but it isn't the first time this has happened, I've lived here for twenty years and seen it like this several times. The racecourse and cricket ground are frequently under water. 1947 was much worse by all accounts.


View towards the cricket ground from the main bridge in Worcester


Worcester racecourse

The going is wet


Thank you to my guest photographer (my husband and his phone camera).

31 comments:

  1. Thank you for reassuring me that all is well in Worcester. Do you have a boat...?
    Ax

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  2. Definitely wet! Hope it improves soon - it is just so dreary seeing grey skies and rain day after day!

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  3. Looks a bit like here in Somerset!

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    1. I think Somerset has had it much worse.

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  4. It really is terrible all over. Down the road from us in Datchet the Thames has now burst its banks and people seem to have been flooded really quickly. I can't help feeling though that the media are making things worse, using phrases like "under siege" and practically taking up residence in flooded gardens.

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  5. I think it's really silly the way they HAVE to have the reporter standing up to his knees in water for every news bulletin. I want to say " for goodness sake, get inside out of the weather"

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    1. Also I think news reporters make residents wade across the screen over and over.

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    2. Good for you if you're home dry. However I find your flippancy regarding the floods disgraceful. My partner is a television news reporter and I can assure you that reporters DO NOT "make residents wade across the screen over and over"

      In fact he has come home from work upset by seeing the conditions that homeowners are having to cope with. Lives are being shattered by these floods, not everyone has been able to insure their properties because of the extortionately high premiums they're being asked to pay.

      While you're revelling in your dry comforts of home please do not broadcast on your blog that things aren't as bad as the reporters are making out, people could be discouraged from donating to the worthy cause of helping the flood victims after reading your words.

      Even if one home or one person or one animal was affected by these floods it would be one too many but I can assure you there are many homes and people and livestock affected.

      If you've no concern for people are you an animal lover? My partner recently had to cover a news story about a farmer shooting his livestock because his land and outbuildings were flooded, his whole winter stock of animal feed was destroyed and he had no resources to either feed his animals or rehouse them. When my partner arrived it was to see bodies of cattle and sheep floating, the farmer was in tears as was my partner and cameraman.

      I can assure you these floods and the damage they're causing are real.

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    3. Helen,

      Thank you for your comment. I am glad to hear that I am wrong about news reporters making people wade through the floods..

      Yes I am very glad that I am home and dry, who wouldn't be? I've had a few emails asking if we are alright after people saw the Worcester floods on tv so I thought I'd mention that we were unaffected.

      I very deliberately have not mentioned the floods in any area other than Worcester where I live. I was simply taking issue with the statement that 'Worcester is under siege'. It isn't under siege. I think I'd have noticed if it was.

      Why do you think I am not aware of the devastating impact the floods are having in other areas of the country - I have not mentioned those at all?

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  6. What a winter you're having in the UK. I hope it gets better soon.

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  7. Goodness, it looks pretty bad. I'm glad to hear you're unaffected. I used to work in York and the river Ouse used to flood badly every year. The locals just got used to it, and I think it was mainly office/retail space that was affected, but I always felt sorry for those businesses right along the river bank.

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  8. We are having flood troubles here with the Thames and Kennet both having overflowed and causing a great deal of trouble, the Army and Navy came over the weekend to protect the electricity station that serves over 40000 houses, and we managed to get out of the village today which we were not expecting to be able to do, so I do understand and feel for you Sue. xx

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    1. You sound a lot worse off than me Amy. I'm not affected by our floods at all as I don't need to get into the city centre.

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  9. I was born and brought up in Worcestershire and you're right, it happens from time to time - as indeed it does all along the Severn, but that never stopped the media jumping on the story train - although having experienced a house flood, I wouldn't wish it on anyone.

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  10. I too used to live in York and felt cross that people stayed away thinking the whole city was cut off, when in fact it was just a very small area by the river - so businesses really suffered. It is bad of course, but the media like to make a big drama out of it!

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    1. That's exactly what's happening here.

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  11. The swans look happy enough.
    Glad to hear it's not as bad as made out, unless you are one of those unfortunate people flooded of course.

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  12. Glad that you're okay Sue, I do feel for those who are flooded. I wish the media would stop whipping people up into a frenzy of demanding river dredging and sandbags. I don't think either will be particularly effective in dealing with this massive volume of water.

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  13. I hope your family and friends are staying cheerful. Floods are horrible. The damage to the footings of buildings is expensive to repair and can be undetected for ages. The damage to furnishings is heartbreaking. But worse still is the smell when the water retreats. That smell stays in the memory for such a long time.

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  14. At one point today, to get from Malvern to Worcester the traffic queue stretched solidly from the centre of Great Malvern to the roundabout where the road joined the Worcester ring road - about 8 miles! We don't flood, but allroutes from here are liable to flood or already flooded. The trains are still running though so grand-daughter had an exciting trip to us today. It must be so wearying for those who have been coping with this since before Christmas without an end in sight.

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  15. Suddenly Scotland doesn't feel like such a soggy spot to live anymore! Bon courage...

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  16. perhaps buy some wellies just in case? and maybe bake a cake for the camera crews?

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  17. Sue, many thanks for your excellent reporting. Thanks also to your guest photographer for his excellent on site pictures. It does seem that the mass media seem to concentrate on the scary parts of the flood story, without giving enough space to more reassuring aspects of how folks have been handling recurring weather conditions for a long, long time.

    All the same...this time around does seem rather awful as the rain just keeps on coming. I'd think that trees' root systems will be coming loose.

    Over here in New York, we just just keep having annoying snow storms about every two or three days. Our next one will be tomorrow (Wednesday) evening into Thursday and is being forecast as a Big Snow. We will see....

    xo

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  18. Anonymous10:53 am GMT

    Feeling sad for Worcester my old home.Here in the North East we have escaped quite lightly except for gale force winds yesterday blowing our fences down.

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  19. Anonymous10:26 am GMT

    hope you are all well slightly concerned as saw worcester on news and it looked rather wet

    take care tess

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    1. Thanks for the concern but we are not affected by the floods at all. As I said, we live well away from the river. We are also much higher than the river and if the water were to reach our front door then the whole of the West Midlands would be under water!

      Riverside properties are flooded which although a horrible experience is far from unknown in Worcester.

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  20. Please read my comment to your reply to Simple Suffolk smallholder above.

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  21. Just typed you a loooong (and very late) reply and Blogger ate it. In a nutshell .. hope the city is drying out. And also that your long silence has nothing to do with either wet feet or the comment you got above. I grew up on the edge of the Somerset Levels and some of the people we've seen on the television news I was at school with. You should hear them on the way bulletins have been edited to reflect the media's disproportionate sense of disaster (and yes of course they and I know that what has happened is disastrous for many). The Dunkirk spirit is alive and well down there and not every one blames the government of the environment agency for the weather x

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    1. Oops, that of should be an or.

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    2. I too would hate to think a previous comment has prompted this hiatus. I love this blog.

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    3. Annie and Tracy, thank you. I hadn't realised I had been silent for so long but it due to neither flood nor comments but lack of inspiration and suitable photos. I'm working on it!

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