Small Delights (III)

Monday, 18 November 2013


The last quinces. Not fit for eating but good to look at as they lie glowing amongst the wet leaves.


A squeaky savoy cabbage. I wish cabbages were smaller: I'm the only one who will eat it.


20 kg of spuds for a fiver.




Leaves and berries the colour of flames. Flickering in the rain.


A hat to match. But now I have run out of knitting. Sad face.


A dish of baked apples to cheer up a yarnless knitter.

32 comments:

  1. Sue, don't you have a stash of yarn from your crocheting days? Couldn't you make another hat from some of that?

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  2. I could, or even a blanket!

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  3. Mmm, delicious apples, and lovely autumn pictures. Where I used to live, the greengrocer used to happily chop big vegetables up so you could just buy a half or a quarter if you wanted. Them were the days. I can't remember how far from Bristol you live, but a trip to Get Knitted would sort out your wool shortage.

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  4. I have exactly the same problem with regard to Savoy cabbage. It is so nice steamed but no one will eat cabbage or sprouts in our house but me. Sometimes I still buy one but I hate to see any of it go to waste. Lovely photos by the way.

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  5. Lovely photos. That knitting is brilliant what is the yarn called?

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    1. It's Rico Poems, an aran weight yarn. It is rather fabulous isn't it?

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  6. I wish for smaller cabages too as there is just myself to cater for.

    I really like the colours of your yarn.

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  7. I agree about the smaller cabbages, you could try a bag of kale instead, that seems to go quicker for just one. Love the colours in your hat, it is lovely. Hope that you find some more yarn soon! xx

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    1. I intended to buy kale but it was a ridiculous price!

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  8. Anonymous6:37 pm GMT

    hi lovely photos, with regards to cabbage i was stood in the queue at the farm shop behind a lady who asked if she could just buy a few leaves of a cabbage as only she liked it. Your farm shop might let you have a couple of the leaves if you ask sweetly
    tess

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    1. It certainly is worth a try, thanks Tess and CJ for the suggestion.

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  9. I'm coming to realize the importance of a yarn stash. Being without yarn was never a crisis when I just crocheted. But, somehow, knitting is so much more addictive that I can't imagine being without it now. You'll just have to do what I'm doing right now, Sue, and have four projects on the go at once. You pick the one to suit your mood each day and never run out of knitting. (Of course, I can only knit for about 10 minutes a day right now, as my hand is only partially healed.)

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    1. It is so, so addictive. Hoping to acquire more yarn soon.

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  10. wow where did you buy 20kg of potatoes for £5????? that's amazing

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    1. Yes, it's the cheapest way of buying spuds -works out at about 11p a pound. I get them from my local farm shop. There are several farm shops around Worcester and £5 for a 20kg sack is pretty standard. Obviously you need to be able to transport them home and store them somewhere cool and dry. I keep mine in the garage and they last us 6 to 8 weeks.

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  11. Ooo! Those baked apples look so good. You've reminded me how good they are. I must make some this week!

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  12. the potatoes are a bargain!!! I love the colours of the yarn, Sue..... so lovely and warm.... I love to mix cabbage and bacon as I think the flavours combine quite well. Enjoy!! Pati x

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  13. The Knitting Parlour in Malvern a good stock if you want an immediate fix! I usually buy online though i'm trying not to buy at all - I could knit for a long time just using my stash!

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  14. Oh Sue, I love everything in this post.

    I agree about most cabbages being way too big. They are truly beautiful vegetables, but just so big. (I must remember this on my Wednesday farmers market visit.)

    Your knitted hat just sings wonderful autumn colourway songs. Surely you will be able to find more yarn...if it means buying more, it means buying more. This is how it is for knitters.

    All those outdoors views of berries, leaves etc. give my eyes much joy.

    I keep buying small apples at my farmers market. They are so much easier to have as a snack. Still, I might have to consider some larger apples this week. The air is getting cooler, it might be time to renew acquaintances with preheating my oven, and baking might commence. Baked apples, with or without pastry partnering, is delicious!

    Sue, it's so much fun to visit your posts. Every single time.

    xo

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  15. This is why stashing is imperative. One must never, ever, run out of yarn!

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  16. Despite various attempts, I still haven't managed to convince the daughters to eat cabbage - a pity, because savoy cabbage in butter with chilli seeds is divine at this time of year.

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    1. That does indeed sound divine.

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  17. I love the colours of your hat.

    I would have been tempted by the cabbage too.
    How about:
    - 1/4 steamed, served with gravy
    - 1/4 in a stir fry
    - 1/4 fried with onions and bacon à la Delia
    - 1/4 shredded into minestrone soup.

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    1. Oh, fab ideas, thank you!

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  18. Your autumn is looking a wonderful affair. Cast on something new, quick!

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  19. Lovely colours and inspiring as usual. Can I put in a request for some 'getting ready for Christmas' posts?

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    1. Yes, there will be some although they'll be much the same as previous years but that's the nature of Christmas :-)

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  20. I have never seen a quince in real life, let alone tried eating any. Maybe one day...

    Cabbage, on the other hand... anyone with a Polish heritage was probably brought up on the stuff! Speaking of which - stuffed cabbage leaves (with a minced pork, rice, herbs and onion mixture) fried in butter until crisp are delicious. Cabbage (Savoy and otherwise) is always good with anything porky but I like it shredded in soups too.

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    1. Anyone with a Mennonite heritage grew up on stuffed cabbage leaves, too. I've never made them myself, because each time my mother made them was the only time I heard her swear (each time a cabbage leaf ripped).

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  21. My mother always pre-cooked Savoy cabbage, drained it, chopped it up finely, and stirred it into mashed potato, well seasoned, and we loved it. And I still do, but I'm somewhat half-hearted about The Gardener's favourite, kale......

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  22. I've just had to throw away half a white cabbage. To be honest the coleslaw I made with the other half wasn't great and is fermenting in a plastic box in the fridge. There is a lovely recipe for lamb with white cabbage pilav in the Moro Cookbook which I have just remembered. Drat.

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  23. What a lovely autumn coloured hat!

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