Quince Jelly

Thursday, 3 October 2013

It may be like this outside


 But inside we have pots of vermilion.


Yesterday I cut up and cooked about 10 kg of quinces. Not all at once. I did it in three batches straining the juice in between. I didn't bother leaving the juice to strain overnight because I had so much, 12 pints (7.5 US quarts) in all. I put half into plastic bags and then into the freezer. I may make more jelly at a later date or I may think of something else to do with it. The remaining 6 pints I made into jelly today. I did this in two batches and ended up with 9 1lb jars plus a little ramekin full.


I made some scones and bought some clotted cream in order to sample the jelly in style. It was then that Tom dropped his bombshell.

'I don't really like quince jelly' he said before disappearing into his bedroom.


I just wish I'd saved a bit of my Tesco Everyday Vodka to help me deal with the shock. Vodka everyday seems like a good idea sometimes but this was for making quince vodka which will be ready in time for Christmas by which time I might possibly have forgiven Tom for not liking quince jelly.


46 comments:

  1. Oh dear. It's a beautiful color. I'm intrigued by everyday vodka, though...

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  2. A vodka a day keeps the doctor away! Perhaps not. Love the colour of the quince jelly.

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  3. The jelly looks beautiful! Hope that the vodka lasts long enough to turn into Quince Vodka. Sounds as though it will be lovely.

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  4. Anonymous6:20 pm BST

    I'll have Tom's share. My quince love began in South Korea. Tasting mogwa tea for the first time coincided with noticing this tree with bumpy fruit in a corner of the dilapidated Humanities building of the local university. That tea and that tree is how I found your blog!
    Soraya

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  5. I think the jelly looks delicious - you are so lucky to have such an abundance of quinces!!!

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  6. Such a beautiful colour -bet it tastes lovely!

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  7. Perhaps Tom needs to be reminded of the fate of heretics in times past.....

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  8. Oh Gawd, every year it's the same. I promise myself I will buy quinces. I never can find them. I read you blog. You are doing ridiculously mouthwateringly fabulous things with quinces. I am distraught. Buying it in tiny jars at ridiculous prices in posh shops is NOT any kind of substitute. I am moving on. But not before I resolve that NEXT YEAR I will buy quinces.

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  9. I worry that 37.5% vol isn't strong enough to dull the shock of such a revelation.

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  10. I am laughing at the Everyday Vodka. Perfect. The colour of the quince jelly is stunning. Worth making for that stained glass effect alone. I find it hard to believe he doesn't like quince jelly. Maybe he is just trying to torture you.

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  11. You have made me want to try some quince jelly- I will have to go on a jelly search. Then I will let you and Tom know my verdict...Ax

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  12. Love the tale of Tom. My mother was very proud of a particular cake. She kept making it. Perfectly. One day I told her how much a loathed it. She was crushed. She never made it again. I was so glad that horrible thing never appeared again in our house, but I suspect she never completely recovered.

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  13. Oh dear. While it's wonderfully gratifying when our children eat the food we make them with lip-smacking delight and huge appetites, it's just plain awful when they dislike something with such brutal honesty. Perhaps it's "just a phase"? I've got no idea what I'm talking about - clearly - but I am hoping I can pass off all disagreeable teenage opinions as "just a phase". x

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  14. Tom is clearly in need of psychiatric help. But then, I'd like anything that was on top of scones with clotted cream.

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  15. All the more for you, Sue ...

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  16. I feel your pain...my three sons all decided they don't like sweet things anymore. If they didn't look like their parents, I would be sure they were switched at birth with foundlings! lol

    Re: vodka Did you know that when making pie crust if you combine vodka and water in a 50-50 mix to use in the crust where water is called for, that it makes a very tender crust? Apparently vodka inhibits the formation of gluten, is tasteless and cooks away. I took a cooking class to learn to make pie crust this way. It works, too! It is the best pie crust I've ever made.

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  17. Sue, I am sorry about Tom's quince jelly opinion, but think that I would be overjoyed to sample some of that scrumptious quince jelly. With clotted cream, of course.

    (I also love all the everyday vodka comments, with special points for that pastry making tip just above.)

    It is so much fun and so educational to visit here. xo

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  18. Anonymous1:47 am BST

    Good news. More for you. I'm thrilled my DS doesn't eat chocolate. (Not as thrilled he doesn't eat meat.) I didn't like pepper jelly when growing up. On my way to growing up. Now grown up I wish I had a jar of my mother's pepper jelly. Or any of her jelly, for that matter. Sorry she gave it up one day. Yes, I guess I could make my own. I wish I knew what quinces taste like. Love the photo.

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  19. Oh I do sympathise! My favourite jam above all others is damson - on toast, scones, with yoghurt, any way at all. I just love the flavour. My kids won't touch it and my homemade offerings are spurned. "Is that all there is? Can't we have something else?" "I don't like that one"
    Shame as we have a little tree... All other jam is made from fruit that is given to us or foraged so there is always more damson than other types.

    Can I ask about chelly - what proportion of chillies do you use, please? And if using dried chillies, how much would you use for a pint of apple juice?

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    1. Damson is my favourite too and my kids only like it as chutney.

      I used about 60-70g of frozen chillies to 2 pints of juice. I think you need less dried chillies because the heat is more concentrated but I'm not certain -google knows I expect.

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  20. Vermillion, viridian and cobalt blue. Love the placement.

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  21. Oh dear that must have been a big shock! I've never eaten a quince so can't comment either way!

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  22. Haha ha ! that is such a funny story ! I keep chuckling to myself when I think of it. I have 4 sons all grown now but many is the time like you I performed the labours of Hercules only to find them completely wasted on my oblivious offspring !
    You need to offer it for sale on line and your legions of fans will rush to buy it all up and you will have a nice wad of cash for christmas or vodka.

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  23. Ooooh, pass me a scone! I love quince jelly with roast chicken or any meat come to that! My quince tree planted last autumn (3yr stock) had one quince last season and none this year; our local W.I. market sells fruit though so I can still make a few jars! Fingers crossed for next year's crop.

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  24. You can't fool me, I know those jars are filled with orange fairy liquid, and you don't own a quince tree at all - it's all a front!!
    You do get a job done well, don't you - that's some accomplishment knocking that lot out, bet it feels pretty good and 'homey' to have a larder full of preserves. I am jealous.
    x

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    1. Bugger, she's onto me.

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  25. What gorgeous looking jelly! I love making it, and having a cupboard full, but no one else in this house eats any jam or jelly, so it feels a bit pointless just for me. I only get through three or four jars a year. I've never tried quince, though. It looks very tempting!

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  26. Anonymous8:07 am BST

    If only I had access to some beautiful quinces like yours. I live near Evesham and thought they would be easy to find but, so far, no luck. Have had to make do with damsons so far. In the past I have made quince marmalade using grated quinces and it is fabulous. Such a distinctive flavour - delicious on toasted muffins on a cold winter afternoon. Maybe you should use the quince from your quince vodka when it is finished to make some - it could be quite potent!

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    1. Email me Anonymous I may be able to help you.

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  27. Love the colours on your windowsill... so pure and vibrant!! I secretly love that my kids don't like dark chocolate (yet!) as it means more for moi....(he,he...)
    He may one day return to his appreciation of quinces by trying the quince vodka!
    Have a lovely weekend, Pati x

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  28. Anonymous8:10 pm BST

    Where would the blog world be without the scone! Yours look extra inviting ;and they are home made and not bought at a National Trust tea room.

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  29. I imagine you felt much as I did when my daughter announced, aged 12, that she'd rather I stopped knitting things for her!

    Me, I adore quince jelly!

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  30. Did you mean you froze the strained juice to use later, or did you freeze the cooked quinces to make jelly later? I always have heaps of quinces to process and would love to put some away to process later, however I've never tried it.

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    1. I froze the strained juice to use later. I haven't tried making quince jelly with frozen juice before but I'm pretty certain I did it with crab apple juice once. I've also made jams and jellies from frozen fruit so I can't see why it wouldn't work. I've also frozen oranges and made marmalade with them. I will also be cooking and puréeing some of my quinces to freeze for eating with yogurt.

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    2. I will also stop using the word also so much!

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  31. I am sorry but I did laugh when I read this post...children, honestly! We made sloe gin this weekend, ready for Christmas and have been collecting hips. I read that you should freeze the hips first as this improves the flavour, do you have any top tips? Sarah xo

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    1. No tips for hips I'm afraid. I've never used them, they seem a bit labour intensive and quite honestly the quinces are enough work for me!

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  32. As things have progressed to a freezing juice conversation! Any thoughts on how to turn my grapes into juice (I am not going to jump up and down on them in a bucket!!) and can I then freeze the juice to make into jelly later. Should I make some juice (as per your quinces) and then freeze that before going all the way to jam. Can I just freeze the grapes whole and then deal with them later.

    So many questions. Sorry!

    Sorry also for all of the !!!!!!

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    1. Gosh, I know nothing about grapes except that I like them best made into wine, sorry, perhaps Google knows?

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    2. I tried Mr G - no use! Perhaps you are right Sue, I should just drink grapes in ready made wine from the shops and let the birds have the grapes - they are not "eating grapes"!

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    3. Is this link any good? Sounds just like making other fruit jellies to me in which case I would think you could freeze the juice.

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    4. Sue, you are a dream, I didn't find this at all, it seemed like everything else I read said things like "take your grape juice" as the first step. I will have a go at making the juice and freezing and then I can jelly later!

      You are a star, thank you soooooo much for this. Truly, much appreciated. xxx

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  33. Everyday Vodka..... has left me almost speechless;-)

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    1. Sneaky photography -it's 'everyday value'. It does imply that vodka is a basic grocery item though doesn't it?

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