Baking With Quinces


I have found that my family will eat quinces if I cook and purée them and then add them to pastry or cake. 
The pictures above and below are of Old- Fashioned Quince Tart from Jane Grigson's Fruit Book. It doesn't look madly exciting but I can assure you it tasted delicious.

It is basically a sweet quiche. Half a pint of cream, two eggs and some quince purée are sweetened and poured into a pastry case, in this particular case a puff pastry one. The eggs were separated and the whites beaten before being folded into the rest of the ingredients, this gives a light moussey texture to the tart and I see no reason why this couldn't be done in a savoury tart too. 

 Jane recommends it be served warm but I discovered at 11pm last night that it was actually nicer cold.


The cake below is a variation on this apple cake. I simply replaced the grated apple with 8 oz of sweetened quince purée and left out the cloves. A nice plain cake, moist and deliciously quincey.



My freezer is now full of little tubs of quince purée waiting to be turned into cakes and tarts which pleases me greatly.

Comments

  1. Thanks for the ideas - our local farm shop had quinces in the "Free to a Good Home" box and I took some so will give these recipe ideas a try.

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  2. They both look very yummy Sue. I love the way that you discovered that the tart was better cold - at 11pm!! Not sure if that means you only just finished making it them or if a snack attack struck, but either way, good to know that you enjoyed it, which is the most important thing. Happy quinceing!

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  3. They certainly do look yummy!
    I see Hugh F-W has some quince recipes in his new fruit book, including quince and blue cheese pizza ...

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  4. Always inventive, Sue.

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  5. Anonymous8:12 pm BST

    Like the idea of you sneaking quinces into your family. Reminds me of those suggestions to fool young children by grating vegetables into sauces..

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    1. Oh there's no question of sneaking, one can't disguise the flavour of quince. They don't like the texture of the fruit but purée is ok.

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  6. The tart looks delicious, I'm always on the lookout for things that are good to eat at 11pm. I do need a supply of quinces though. At the moment I am up to my eyeballs in windfall apples, and no freezer room left.

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    1. Do you have a cider press? :-)

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  7. We had your Lamb & Quince tagine (or at least a variation on it!) for dinner tonight and it was delicious - thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. Glad you liked it Robyn. We had it last week with beef instead of lamb.

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  8. That apple -> quince cake variation looks fab. In fact I could just do with a wee slice of it now to keep me fuelled for writing a little longer ;-)

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  9. They both look very delicious. I'm glad I'm not the only one who goes in search of cake at 11 pm. And if I can't find cake I resort to nutella on toast. x

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  10. We were given a large box of quinces this week and spent half the weekend turning them into quince jelly. Now just looking for ideas of what to do with quince jelly! I imagine we could use it much like you do the puree here in adding dollops of it to flavour things :)

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  11. Anonymous12:17 pm BST

    It looks in the second photo as if you have served your quince "quiche" with some transparent gravy.What is it and did the pudding need it? Thank you.

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    1. Well spotted, I'd forgotten about the gravy. It's a sauce made from the syrup leftover from cooking the quinces thickened a little with arrowroot. No, the pudding did not need it and won't bother with it next time - not that it was unpleasant, just unnecessary.

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  12. Delicious Sue!!! You are always so resourceful!!! Pati xx

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  13. I'm going to whisper something … I've never eaten quince before. Your pie though, looks wonderful. Is it a bit custard-y?

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  14. That's way past my bed time but worth waiting up for.

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  15. Sweet quiche. My world has just expanded.

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  16. I am really interested in your idea of using fruit puree in cakes and wanted to ask how "wet" was your puree? Damsons are to me what quinces are to you, so I wondered if a damson cake would work in the same way. The puree I make is quite sloppy and of course it is not at all "cake coloured" as quince puree is, so the whole thing might be a frightful burgundy hued mess, but I'd like to have a go. Should I boil down the puree a bit/a lot? What do you think?

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    1. Nicky my quince purée was quite substantial, like apple sauce and not runny like damson purée which I also have in my freezer. I'm not sure that damson purée would work in a cake in quite the same way because it will add a lot of moisture to the mixture. You could try reducing the purée but I have a feeling it will get very syrupy. How about folding the damson purée into whipped cream and using it to sandwich a plain victoria sponge?

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  17. I've never even thought about quiche purée - I'll have to try it one day! I'm usually lazy and just go with the old family recipes but I might have to give your quiche a try - it sounds delicious!

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  18. Such a timely post Sue ... I missed the local quince fair so only have the few quinces a friend picked up for me. Not enough for Jelly but enough to puree and freeze a couple of cakes worth :)

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  19. Anonymous7:57 pm BST

    hope your well sue
    do you still go for goose for christmas ? how heavy is the one you buy ? what do you make with leftovers ? thankyou
    tess

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    1. Hello Tess,
      I haven't cooked a goose for Christmas since 2010 when I spilt its fat all over my foot -ouch. That's not to say I may never cook a goose again. When I do I shall get it from Goodman's Geese who have a useful chart here to help you decide how big a goose you need. As for leftovers, well, there isn't much leftover on a goose. A lot of the goose is empty space because of its big carcass. I usually make a hash with the leftover meat and veg from Christmas lunch and then I make the carcass into stock and freeze it for soup.

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  20. Anonymous6:00 pm BST

    thankyou....id forgotten about your poor foot sorry if i brought back bad memories. I will go and have a look at that chart
    thanks for your help
    tess

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