September Posy

Tuesday, 10 September 2013






September's posy comes to you courtesy of the Charlecote Park farm shop. These dahlias are what I would have growing in my garden at this time of year if only I could be bothered to be a proper gardener. The shop had buckets and buckets of them along with piles and piles of eccentric squashes.


Meeting Ali at a rainwashed NT property is becoming a habit. A very good habit. The weather doesn't put a stop to a good natter after all.


In the gardens there were ancient mulberry trees. The fruit was ripening, we scrumped a few and I thought about planting a mulberry tree to keep my quince company.

23 comments:

  1. Love the squash and the "eccentric" description. It fits them doesn't it!

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  2. Mulberry trees are a mixed blessing. When the berries drop and you stand on them they ruin your floors. If you don't pick all the fruit, the wasps and flies move in fast and the whole tree becomes a buzzing humming insect banquet. When you do manage to get the fruit picked before the winged beasties move in, they make delicious jelly and crumble. The trees are beautiful. They are the last to leaf in spring but the last to drop in autumn. The bark is rough and gnarly. I love and hate ours in equal measure. I am keeping an eye out for a sucker from ours which I can post to you. It is not playing the same game as me.
    So glad you had a rainy natter...
    Ax

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  3. I had never seen a mulberry until now. I had no idea they looked like that. Thank you for enlightening me.

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    1. That one isn't ripe, they go a much darker red when ripe and they are about the size of a large blackberry.

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  4. The dahlias are perfect, and most charmingly jugged.

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  5. Sue, it's fun to think that you and I are both admiring beautiful dahlias in garden/farmers markets. Aren't their color mixes astonishing?

    Moving on to mulberry trees. I think that there is one in front of a brownstone house near my own street. We all are careful when walking underneath these pretty berries, which have a dangerous habit of falling fully ripened from their branch and changing one's blouse, sweater, jacket, skirt or trousers forever. Much better to consider their contribution to a crumble.

    xo

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  6. I miss Charlecote - I used to go there often, but now I live in France...

    Penny
    x

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  7. What a gorgeous posy Sue!! The colours of nature are astonishing!!
    I've always meant to visit Kew Gardens when the Mulberries on the tress are ready to be picked so I better hurry!!

    Pati x

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  8. I hope you were both wearing purple. The last time I scrumped mulberries it was all too obvious what i had been doing.
    Slightly relieved that you bought the dahlias. The day I have a cutting garden with dahlias in it will be the day I know I have turned into my father.

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  9. I'm so glad you said those dahlias were from a shop. I nearly died from jealousy at the thought of all that colour and abundance in your garden. My dahlias died while we were on holiday. Lovely, colourful posy though, and even more lovely to meet upvwith a blogging friend. X

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  10. Lovely happy flowers. I just bought a teeny tiny mulberry twig online. I'm probably only about a decade away from actual mulberries.

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  11. Those are lovely dahlias, bought from a lovely place! (We went there on Sunday for the first time)

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  12. How do you find dahlias last as cut flowers? They look as if they will last for ages but I am often disappointed.

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    Replies
    1. Four days later they still look great but they are beginning to drop petals.

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  13. My favourite farm shop for unusual veg, though I nearly died when I bought heritage tomatoes and they cost £7 (don't tell my husband!) Apropos your fruit jellies, I don't have a crab apple tree, but wondered whether you've ever tried using hedgerow wild apples? Might give it a trial just to see how they fare

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    1. I think wild apples would be perfect for jellies. We have lots near us but I haven't used them because I always have my crab apples. I'd love to hear how it works out if you go ahead.

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    2. I'll let you know! Plenty of damsons to practice with, though not quite ripe yet.

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  14. Such gorgeous photos - they remind me why autumn is my favourite time of year. I've just read in the National Trust magazine that there is a Quince Day at Greyfriars House & Garden on the 26th October. I'm guessing that isn't too far from you? Although I'm sure you wouldn't need to buy any quince-related produce there will be a gardener on hand to answer any quince-related questions. Naturally, I thought of you!
    I also wanted to ask the name of the lovely organic supermarket you blogged about some months ago? Have read back a while & tried a search but can't find it!
    Thank you!
    Jo x

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    1. Yes, I saw the item about Quince day at Greyfriars -maybe I could flog some of my quince related produce?!

      The supermarket is Wholefoods at Cheltenham.
      http://thequincetree65.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/super-market.html

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  15. Ooooh! So that's what a dahlia looks like? I had no idea. You've put together a very beautiful posy.

    Love the Crookneck squash, too. I love pumpkin and squash season...so many weird and wonderful shapes to try out.

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  16. Gorgeous, gorgeous posy. All my favourite colours in one stunning photograph! The blue and white striped jug is the perfect foil for those rich and sumptuous jewel tones. Thanks for the visual treat today!

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