August Posy and More Not Camping


An August posy.
Two roses, some lavender, yellow daisies and a couple of sprays of goldenrod.  I love goldenrod, it flowers for so long and carries on looking beautiful long after it has flowered especially on frosty autumn days.



Not Camping continues in its leisurely fashion. Warm sunny days, a little light gardening, pain au chocolat for breakfast, ice creams for pudding and chilled white wine in the evening. We're eating too well and too much. At least, I am eating too much, Tom stops eating when he is full saying that if he eats when he isn't hungry he will get fat. A boy of sense.


Above is a dish of which Tom ate a modest portion and I ate the rest. It is émincés de volaille from Elizabeth David's French Provincial Cooking. It is simply leftover chicken in cheese sauce. The sauce is made with milk, chicken stock and cream and is flavoured with nutmeg and the cheese is gruyère. It is finished with breadcrumbs.


I bought more fruit than we could eat. We like fruit but when there's ice cream..... The strawberries were getting squashy so I decided to turn them into lollies (popsicles). I blended them with sugar and yogurt. That's clotted cream yogurt by the way. I added a big dollop of clotted cream to my last batch of yogurt, hence the golden crust. I reasoned that since clotted cream has been cooked I wouldn't need to heat it first. It worked spectacularly well.


I bought some drippingly ripe cantaloupe melons, such a treat as they are so often disappointing. I thought melon might make an interesting lolly so I blended it with some fruit juice to sharpen it up a bit and thought what a pretty colour it made.


I will post some pictures of the frozen lollies later this week.


Lastly I made my redcurrants into jelly.

I made it by tipping all my frozen currants into a preserving pan and cooking slowly for about 45 minutes until thoroughly soft. My currants had been frozen when quite wet from washing so they had quite a bit of ice clinging to them but I didn't add any more water.

 I strained the juice through a jelly bag overnight. I measured the juice and for every litre of juice I added 750g of granulated sugar.

I stirred it over a low heat until all the sugar had dissolved and then I brought it to a rolling boil and boiled for 8 minutes by which time it had set.

 I potted it into jars which I had sterilised in a 100 degree oven for 20 minutes. I got three 1lb jars from about 7lbs of currants.

 A recipe which adds water to the fruit will naturally yield more jelly but this waterless method yields a better flavour.



Comments

  1. I much prefer the idea of 'not camping' over 'camping'! Plus the food all looks delicious.

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  2. Everything looks lovely, the flowers and the redcurrant jelly especially! Hope you are enjoying your not camping.

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  3. Gorgeous posy and what you've been cooking looks delicious, as always. When this is what "not camping" is like, why would anyone choose to go camping? haha :o)

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  4. It all looks very yummy. Where did you get the ice-lolly moulds? I make a lot of home-made icecream but very rarely make lollies which would make a nice change.
    The chicken recipe looks absolutely fab certainly will give that a go
    Julie

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  5. Sue, thank you for this reporting another successful, pleasant and productive day of not camping.

    I do have to say that your posy with the goldenrod flowers brought back memories of how my father suffered from goldenrod-delivered hay fever. For some years, I thought I might have caught those genetic signals, but now don't know if the allergy has abated, or if city living has removed the culprit from my vicinity.

    All the same, your posy photographed very well.

    xo

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  6. Oh I do love your week of Not Camping. And clotted cream in yoghurt, it's genius. I'm thinking I might try your jelly recipe with blackcurrants, as I've thousands, and this way all of the pips are removed.

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  7. Oh, ripe cantaloupe. One of life's best pleasures.

    In fact, on my very favourite food memories is eating cantaloupe and black pepper gelato in Cannobio (on Lago Maggiore in Italy). You wouldn't think that ice-cream and melon would 'go' but oh, it was one of the most completely and utterly delicious things I have ever, ever eaten. Pure bliss.

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  8. I love to read of your experiments with food, the results always look wonderful too.

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  9. By a strange coincidence I turned to Elizabeth David this week. I have a compendium of French Country Cooking, Summer Cooking and Mediterranean Cooking. She has been languishing on the shelf for too long. Ripe melons are a scarce commodity. You were lucky to find some.

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    1. She languishes a bit on my shelves too because she can be uncompromising. I'm sure she wouldn't approve of my cooking.

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  10. reading your posts always leaves me hungry.

    Stop that.

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  11. What Monica said! At this rate you'll have a bunch of bloggers knocking on your door politely asking which way to the émincés de volaille, salted caramel ice creams, and the strawberry yoghurt lollies.

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  12. That all looks amazingly delicious and colourful. I would love a jam making lesson from you! I seem to make fruit flavoured araldite unfortunately - setting anxiety probably to blame! x

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    1. Actually this batch of jelly is a little firm. I think 5 minutes would have been enough. It tastes nice though.

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    2. Thanks for the tip. Using the chicken recipe tonight! x

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  13. Another beautiful posy, Sue. I really like the look of that chicken dish. And your ice lollies look a lot better than mine. I simply poured raspberry yogurt into moulds and tried to tell the kids it was ice cream. They were having none of it, especially when (horror!!) they realised the yogurt had "bits in". x

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  14. I love your photographs! So colourful and evocative. I always feel like I could cook anything once I've been reading your blog. I know what you mean about disappointing cantaloupes. I find that if they smell good, they taste good, so I only buy fragrant cantaloupes and that has always worked for me. Thanks for the good tip about not eating when I'm not hungry. Any tips for actually doing that?!

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    1. Not really! It's hard isn't it?

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