Red, Amber, Lime

Saturday, 24 November 2012

 Red

Amber

Lime

Annie has written a typically thought-provoking post about blogging. Do read it.
I commented that when I blog I upload my photos first and the words just happen around them. This post is supposed to be about lime marmalade but as well as my limey pics I uploaded a picture of the red berries lying on the ground and one of my very last jar of January 2011 marmalade. What did I see but traffic lights.


The marmalade I made here has lasted nearly two years. Charlie has decided he likes granola for breakfast and consequently our average marmalade consumption has declined.


I thought a few jars of lime marmalade would tide us over nicely until Seville orange season in January next year. But now that I've made it and the expected yield of five jars turned out to be ten jars plus a basinful in the fridge I think it may last us until January 2014.


I used the recipe for Lime and Rum Marmalade in Diana Henry's Salt, Sugar, Smoke. I reluctantly decided to leave out the 2 fl oz of white rum. Even a 35cl bottle of Bacardi is £8.50. I had dark rum but I felt that wouldn't look very attractive, besides I am saving it for a pudding that needs to be made tomorrow.*

I'm a very slapdash marmalader. I cannot be bothered to slice the peels really thinly into shreds. Instead I fling it all in the food processor -hence the big pieces of peel. I didn't bother with scraping the membrane and flesh from the peels either -too hard.


 What a shame cooked limes do not retain their lovely limey greenness. Fortunately they do retain their zingy limey flavour, just the thing for your morning toast. I think it will also be delicious stirred into coconut yogurt, used to top coconut creams or to sandwich a coconut cake.

Slapdash Lime Marmalade - adapted from Diana Henry's Salt Sugar Smoke

Makes about 10 450g sized jars

12-14 limes
2 - 2.5kg of caster sugar
3 pints  (about 1.7 l) water

Cut limes in half and juice. Reserve juice and cover the lime halves with water and refrigerate overnight. Presumably this helps soften the skins.

Next day drain lime halves and either shred by hand or throw in a food processor fitted with a slicing blade. Put shredded peels in a preserving pan with the lime juice and the water. Cook very gently for 1½ hours. Cover the pan with a double layer of foil to prevent too much evaporation.

Make sure the peels are really soft -cook for longer if necessary. I didn't find it necessary.
Weigh the water and fruit (easiest on an electric 'add-and-weigh' scale).
Add and equal weight of sugar. Pour it all back in pan. Stir over a low heat to dissolve the sugar.
Bring to a full rolling boil and boil for 5 mins or as long as necessary to reach setting point. mine took 5 mins.
Pot into sterilised jars. I sterilise jars by washing them and drying them out in a 100 degree oven for about 20 mins.

* Tomorrow is Stir Up Sunday  -your last chance to make your Christmas pudding!


26 comments:

  1. Hi Sue,

    I just popped by to say thanks for your comment about my photo and regarding my rosacea. I tried Metronidazole a few years ago and it didn't help me, but laser treatment has had amazing results, even though it's not a permanent cure. It has changed my life as I feel 'normal' for the first time in about ten years and I'm not too embarrassed to leave the house any more!

    Also well done to you too for getting all the compounds words! I got really stuck on tea leaf as that's the word I thought of but I knew it wasn't a compound word. I submitted it anyway and then Ali said I was right and she hasn't realised tea leaf was two words!

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  2. I am now mortified at having chucked out a big bag of limes; supermarket end of the day bargain that I never got round to using ... just couldn't drink enough gin to use them up!
    Why didn't I think of marmalade! Especially as I'm down to the last jar of orange.

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    Replies
    1. Citrus juice freezes well in an ice cube tray -perfect when you need a couple of spoonfuls for a dish.

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    2. You can freeze slices or wedges of lime for G&T in a small food bag, so they can double-task as both ice and a slice. I saw this on Superscrimpers. Sadly I can't stand gin.

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  3. Your photos are always so vividly beautiful that your approach of building your posts round them makes perfect sense. One commentator over at Annie's likens our 'vanity blogging' to hand-knitting one jumper rather than buying a stash of inferior machine-made ones, and your blog is the homemade lime marmalade equivalent of that.

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    Replies
    1. Wasn't that a good analogy? -especially now you have applied it to my marmalade!

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  4. What lovely photos :) I love marmalade but I've never made it - maybe that should be a challenge for me in the new year!

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  5. I can actually taste the lime juice looking at your photos Sue. I have never made Lime Marmalade either, but there is a first time for everything. I love the clean sharp taste of limes and the smell is wonderful.

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  6. I used to blog just the same way: pictures first, then words. The lime marmalade sounds divine. Am also going to follow your hint re freezing juice in ice cube trays--no more out-of-date lemons! K x

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  7. I remember you mentioning lime marmalade on a post a month or so back, and I was hoping you'd get round to making some. Thanks!

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  8. Don't cringe, Sue! Roses Lime Marmalade was my all time favourite when I was a girl and I always took a pot of it back to school with me at the beginning of term! I also like pineapple jam and adore ginger jam ... actually, anything with a kick in it! I love your lime marmalade seen against the light, very decorative!
    I agree about blogging. The photos are put up and inspire the words that wind their way around them!

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    1. I like Rose's too. My granny would always have it. I liked the jar. I think they must put colouring in it though.

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    2. It's more than likely true about the colouring... though I think they're being stricter now about artificial colouring and it could be a squirt of spinach juice (?!) or something 'natural'! I know that raspberry and stawberry yoghourts are often coloured with beetroot juice!

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    3. It's chlorophyll extract! Leaf green literally.

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  9. I loved Annie's post too, and it has got me thinking. I follow very few of the typical ad-ridden pro blogs but I do follow quite a lot of blogs that are the backstory of creative businesses and I really enjoy some of those. That hybrid - personal but linked in some capacity to a independant creative business is I suppose where mine falls, but I would continue to write it if i stopped the business because I enjoy it so much and love the connections with others that I have made.

    I have a thing for the taste and smell of limes, just love them. And the smell of a lime tree in blossom is utter bliss. Bx

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    1. I read a lot of blogs like that Belinda. I must say I don't really think of them as pro blogs but can see how they are in a way. They are so much more personal than the typical pro blog and are full of the blogger's own pictures and words which is what I like.

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    2. Exactly! I think they are their own category and v different from the blogs that are the business themselves. I would hate to be thought of as a pro-blog or a vanity blog! Eeek, identity crisis!!;)

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    3. Absolutely ... a pro-blog is a business in its own right where I'd say a blog like yours Belinda is more akin to a shop window, except it is so much more than that in your case.

      I've nothing against people making money from their blogs - I might myself one day, who knows - but it would have to be from a blog that was all my own work, I think it's quite the opposite of crazy to want to keep my blog authentically mine.

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  10. I love limes so can't imagine why I've never made lime marmalade before. I will definitely rectify the situation and try your recipe. I always put pictures up first and then write my words to fit around too.

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  11. love that lime photo! just spent a while reading all the comments to Annie's post, so many views of what blogging is. I like to think of us as community bloggers. as I rarely brush my hair let alone wear make up I struggle to label myself as vain, so can hardly be a vanity blogger!

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  12. Ha! A marmalade maker after my own heart. I am also slapdash and can't be bothered with all the processes. I have a 'marmalade day' with my daughter every year an we make enough for the year. We use the pressure cooker, too - that knocks so much off the time - esp. when making loads.

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  13. I usually have to scrape around to take a photo for a post, since I don't have a visual brain at all - I compose blog posts in my head, wandering about, and usually what stops them getting to fruition is lax snapping.

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  14. Hi Sue, that marmalade looks delicious! I'm about to start trying preserving but wanted to ask whether you buy new jars and lids or just recycle old ones. I read somewhere that recycling jars was fine but buying new lids was best and they fit most jars, but also have read mixed reviews of Lakeland's lids. Any info on what you do much appreciated! Many thanks, Sian x

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    Replies
    1. Hello Sian,

      I use recycled jars and lids as much as possible. My collection of jars has declined somewhat of late and I bought some jars and lids from Lakeland to supplement it. I have never had any problem with Lakeland's lids.

      Despite making all my own jam and marmalade I still buy quite a lot of food in jars -honey, tomato puree, mayonnaise, olives, mustard -all these can be used for preserving.

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  15. I could have sworn I'd left a comment here ... I only popped back to copy the recipe.

    We get through a lot of honey in our porridge so I use those jars for my jams.

    Thanks for the mention Sue ... that post seems to have taken on a life of its own!

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  16. Pati from London2:22 pm GMT

    That lime marmalade looks divine! I love limes, they always remind me of drinking my favourite cocktail: caipirihna..... Will definitely give this recipe a go. Ta, Pati x

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