Autumn Chill

Wednesday, 7 November 2012

Did you see Lucy Worsley's programme about Dorothy Hartley? If you missed it it's available on iplayer here

I thoroughly enjoyed it and was not only glad to hear and see favourite excerpts from the book but was fascinated to learn more about the redoubtable Miss Hartley and it was a real treat to see film of her at the end of the programme. 

Just one thing niggled. About 22 mins into the programme Lucy is shown putting fruit into a basket. She says they are pears, but they aren't. I'm sure regular readers of this blog will recognise those fruit.

Do check out Lucy's blog for some delicious recipes from Food In England. I intend to try the Tewkesbury saucer batters and the Clifton puffs.




November has brought a definite chill. We have had a couple of frosty mornings and my winter coat has been brought downstairs and gloves are needed when cycling.

Hot breakfasts are also needed. This is my current favourite. Porridge with a spoonful of sunflower butter, a drizzle of honey, some sunflower seeds and dried cranberries.




Lights go on and curtains are drawn early. Chase the dark away with fireworks and candles.


And enjoy some hygge.


(Apologies for candle pictures almost identical to last year's candle pictures. What can I say? I don't buy new tealight holders each year.)

41 comments:

  1. I was watching that programme with my laptop on my knee and saw Lucy picking up the quinces and heard her say "Pears" and thought "No!" and flicked to your blog quickly to confirm what you already knew - those are definitely NOT pears, woman!

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  2. Hello Sue, I also spotted the quinces and was surprised when she said pears! I was disappointed, she missed an opportunity to talk about this wonderful, almost forgotten fruit. And although I love to hear good English on TV (Trinny and Suzannah, Kirstie Allsop, Nigella..OK I mean posh English), for me Lucy's lisp started to grate after about 15 minutes...
    Wonderful program though, enjoyed the various people interviewed especially the potter Mary Wondrausch (my parents bought some of her pottery in the '80s and I remember driving to her house to collect it)!

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    1. That must have been fascinating -it was such a wonderful looking house.

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    2. I'm in agreement with all your points Isabelle. I thoroughly enjoyed the programme, liked Lucy's coat, would love to visit Mary Wondrausch's house and have put the book on my Christmas list.

      Also, seeing Attic24-Lucy's (http://attic24.typepad.com/weblog/2012/09/early-frost.html) canal made me think how small the blog world is so often. I came to The Quince Tree from there and am so pleased I did.

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  3. Yes I watched it Sue, fascinating. Did you see the programme 'Timeshift' afterwards about bread. I thought of you. I am on the lookout now for a copy of Dorothy Hartley's book.

    Can I ask you do you have an Ocado savings pass? if so is it worth it do you think.

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  4. I watched it on iPlayer [and then the bread programme] SO grateful that you have confirmed my feelings about the pears/quinces!
    It was extremely interesting though to find out more about this remarkable lady [Dorothy not the Lisping Lucy]
    Mary-The-Potter was marvellous wasn't she?

    my current fave breakfast is porridge sprinkled with cinnamon sugar

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  5. I loved the documentary. The quince/pear scene was odd though. When I replayed it, at about 22.07, there's a scene of quinces being put into a basket. However, at 22.36 she makes reference to pears, and the fruit switches to pears as if by magic.She points to some hanging from a tree and holds one up to a camera. I suspect a production error. The book seems to have been wiped off the British Isles - even Amazon is sold out. It's being reprinted which will take a while. I would love to know if that badly edited copy you first owned was the 2009 Piatkus edition (now being reprinted) If so, I'm tempted to trawl book sales in search of a better quality hardback. Thanks for the heads up on this wonderful program.

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    1. They were definitely pears on the tree but I think it is a quince in her hand. They do look pear-like but I've seen a few in my time and I know a quince when I see one! Even my husband knew they were quinces.

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  6. Sue, I am delighted to report that my marvelous library's stacks have indeed provided me with Food in England...and I don't have to return it until early December!

    I was up very late last night watching our big election results and slept later than usual this morning...then celebrated with my own version of oatmeal, made with a mix of water and milk, with a bit of salt, a little light brown sugar and a mixture of raisins, cranberries and blueberries. Yummmmy!

    Best wishes.

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    1. Hoorah for your excellent library!

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  7. Missed this so must try and get it back on iPlayer before it expires! Went over to the blog and immediately recognized Clifton Puffs from my Bristol childhood - don't think we called them that - must consult Brother to see if he remembers! Very expensive copies of Food in England on ebay! We used to have the recreating medieval costume one but it seems to have disappeared. The Tewkesbury saucer batters sound worth a try. My mother used to make brawn - I can still remember the smell of the pig's head boiling. It wasn't too bad to eat actually, but we were used to it I suppose.

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  8. A continuity problem I'm sure. Quinces in the basket but pears on the tree. A lovely programme though and I was then diverted onto her blog when I went looking for her green coat.

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    1. Oh did you find it? I rather took a fancy to it too -not that it would suit me at all.

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    2. Yes, sort of. It came from Damsels in a dress. She asked her readers for advice about a new coat.http://www.lucyworsley.com/blog/ladies-can-you-please-help-me-find-a-new-coat/

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  9. Yes, I thought they must be quinces too! Thank you for alerting us all to the programme - an absolute delight (even tho' Lucy a bit annoying) - Dorothy was absolutely fascinating & am determined to get the book (s). Did you watch Nigel Slater the other night talking about sweets? He has got to be upthere with the food writers of today.

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    1. I love Nigel Slater's writing and recipes but can't take to him on telly. I don't mind Lucy though!

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  10. Dear Sue
    We (my husband and I - doesn't that sound regal?) enjoyed your blog post yesterday and the programme last night, despite the pear/quince controversy). As you say, what a fascinating lady Dorothy Hartley was. If she had been from an earlier century, no doubt she would have been a lady explorer, venturing bravely into unknown territories and writing about the people she encountered. Her book is now on our wish list although it look as though we may have to wait to get our hands on a copy. It will be worth it.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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  11. Thank you for not buying new tealight holders each year. The people who buy new Christmas decorations each year are insane.

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    1. Well, exactly Kari. They seem new to me after they have been put away for most of the year anyway. It does make for repetitive photos though.

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  12. I have just watched this on i player - absolutely fascinating - what an insight! I hate that brawn stuff tho', my ma used to make it - we called it potted hough in Scotland. It was disgusting then and didn't look any better now. However, folk had to eat something and there wasn't an option - it was best to get it over with and just eat the b****y stuff!

    I was fascinated by the illustrations, too. Beautifully drawn. I have just ordered the book on Amazon. Paperback I'm afraid, but better than nothing.

    I also watched the bread programme last night which was very good, too. I haven't made bread for about a month - we have been away, etc. so I was up this morning and got some dough 'on the rise'. Your recipe of course.

    I think all of these programmes - I watched the Victorian Farm and the Wartime Farm too - are so good at conveying the social history of the time for ordinary people. Always makes me count my blessings and try not to be wasteful.

    Thanks for the heads up about the programme.

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  13. I too was jumping up and down in my seat saying "look, she's picking quinces".... And then she starts rabbiting on about pears. And yes, there was a pear in a later shot.

    Quite amusing, really - that the case of mistaken quince identity ends up being the most memorable moment in a programme about a memorable book written by a truly memorable lady. You have a lot to answer for, Quince Lady !

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  14. Granny Dot8:28 pm GMT

    Hi Sue,

    Despite being Scottish, and living in chilly, damp Scotland, I've never liked porridge. The dried cranberry and sunflower topped concoction looks tempting though. Is it allowed to make a bowl of porridge plus toppings....then pick the yummy bits out to eat while leaving the not-so-good (porridge) part? You know, the kind of thing we didn't let our children do!

    Really enjoying the variety of topics you've blogged about recently. You're an interesting lady.

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    1. Thank you Granny Dot :)

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  15. yes agree about the quinces ,I shouted at the television "those are Quinces not pears".Also agree about Nigel Slater on TV I dont know why but I found the sweets programme a bit creepy.

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    1. I kind of know what Jill means about Nigel S & the sweet programme! He can be a bit wird.

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  16. there was definitely a continuity problem with the quinces and pears...
    I wish there had been less brawn making, sheep shearing and more about the very fascinating Dorothy Hartley.
    I also loved the little clip at the end of Dorothy digging potatoes.

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  17. I thoroughly enjoyed the programme and was so pleased you had recommended it. I'm not sure I've ever really seen a quince but even I thought she had a quince in her hand and not a pear! I would like to get hold of a copy of the book now.

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  18. Anonymous6:59 am GMT

    Thank you so much for your post on Food in England. Without it I would have missed a fascinating programme and what sounds like a wonderful book. Have ordered my copy from Amazon but have got to wait for the reprint! Love your blog, your writing is inspiring. Thank you.

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  19. Penny Beaumont9:23 am GMT

    They were quince, as to the brawn, when my Aunt or my Mum made it the meat was always chopped fine before setting in the jelly. It was always eaten with fresh bread and salad, the English mustard was mixed with vinegar.

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  20. I am so glad you wrote about this programme,it is on tonight again at 7pm.Next to Alison Uttley books and Lark Rise to Candleford,this is my all time favourite book.Having borrowed it from the library first,I bought my hardcover copy in 1974 it is now all stuck up with sellotape to keep it together.I did not see that this programme was on,so would have missed it if not for your post.

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  21. Those photographs are amazing!

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  22. So glad you've confirmed I'm not going dotty. I did see the programme and when it got to the 'pear' moment I sat here thinking 'Did she say pears, those aren't pears!', but there was no one else home to tell me if I'd misheard.

    I also Clarissa Dixon-Wrights breakfast programme yesterday ... I could live on kedgeree and porridge (and peas soup, a few apples, occasional beetroot salad ... maybe I should try it I might lose weight more quickly!)

    Sue, where do you buy your sunflower butter?

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  23. Wow now that's a firework picture! Brilliant and as a new discoverer of porridge i'm going to nick your recipe! Beautiful crisp pics too, I enjoyed them very much x

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  24. I thoroughly enjoyed the programme too. What an inspiring, amazing woman she was!

    I'm so glad you blogged about this book a couple of years ago as is the reason I bought it, and it is indeed a fascinating read.

    I spotted the quinces too!! Your ears must have been burning on Wed night with everybody referring to Quince lady Sue!

    I loved Mary and her house house, It reminded me of Mrs Weasley's 'The Burrow'.

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    1. That's exactly what I thought when I saw Mary's house!

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  25. I am imagining you shouting at the screen during the pear/quince scene!! I have just been given my first ever quinces and about to have a little search though your archives for something easy to do with them. xx

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  26. Lovely autumn images and great food photography of hearty porridge, just right for this time of the year! I'm into making barley soups at the moment - they're so gorgeous! With a handful of lentils (I use the orange ones) the soup is a complete meal and stuffed with any vegetables I have at home!
    Have a great weekend. It's raining here!

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  27. Anonymous3:38 pm GMT

    Yes! Unmistakeably quinces! AnnaC

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  28. Pati from London3:48 pm GMT

    Thanks for the tip on the programme, Sue. I am in the middle of essay writing so I hope it is still on the i-player by the time I finish.... Lovely pics as always and your porridge look so yummy that I may give it a go next week. Have a lovely weekend, Pati x

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  29. I finally found the time to watch the Dorothy program and thoroughly enjoyed it. The gruesome brawn brought back childhood memories of opening my Grandmother's fridge to find a pig's head sitting there. Of course it was for making brawn, which to this day I've never been able to bring myself to try.

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