All Hallows' Eve

Wednesday, 31 October 2012

In the garden there are photo opportunities.












In the kitchen the smell of pumpkin carving is overpowering, the floor is treacherous with slippery seeds.

I am thinking about pumpkin recipes.

The prospect of trick or treating and a sleepover with her cousin  has sent Katie into state of high excitement.

Tom's Pumpkin


Pumpkins by (from left to right) George, Tom and Katie



It is time to make my monthly sampler and I find October has been a month of colour and riches. 



What will November bring I wonder, apart from leftover pumpkin.


23 comments:

  1. Ahhh, season of mellow fruitfulness, or words to that effect! Collect up all those pumpkin seeds, toss in a little oil, roast in the oven for a bit and season with anything you fancy when they are still warm and a little oily.... seat salt and black pepper, garlic, chilli.... the options are endless. Makes a great munchy snack!

    Hugs
    Brenda

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    1. I'm ahead of you Brenda -already roasted and nibbled with a little cajun spice.

      Effect looks right to me :)

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  2. Effect or affect?? Never could make up my mind..... effect now looks plain wrong!

    Brenda again!

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  3. I love the October sampler. it's so cheerful and comforting at the same time! You have a real live raspberry in your garden now? I bet someone has eaten it since you took that photo!
    The pumpkin carvings are fantastic! Tom's looks really scary!
    "Words to that effect" looks perfect to me!

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    1. There are still lots of autumn fruiting raspberries but they're getting a bit mouldy and wet now so I've stopped picking them.

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  4. Effect is correct, strange how words take on an ungainly look when we distrust ourselves isn't it?

    The pumpkins look very good and imaginative, well done to your young people.

    You had sunshine today? How lovely, we have drizzle, still. Never mind, we are
    forecast sun for tomorrow.

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    1. Very brief sunshine this morning. Wet now.

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  5. M-I-L gave us a 10kg pumpkin she had grown herself. When I cut into it this morning, it all looked rather tired and off-colour. And the smell was Not Good. So sadly we are not going to be eating oodles of soup and crunching scrummy cajan seeds. On the up side, the will not be any battles with the Smalls about soup slurping...
    We have banished all the witches in Cambridge. Are they all gaone from Worcester?
    Ax

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    1. They have all gone to bed now I think.

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  6. Our huge carving pumpkins are not really good to eat here in the States........we usually by what are called "pie" pumpkins which are much smaller. Having said that in my frugal days I made soup with my big pumpkins. Now I collect them up from the neighborhood on the following garbage day and put them on my compost. I got 27 last year and by the spring they are all rotted down nicely. I just made Nigel s pork chops with pears from his new book - absolutely divine !

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  7. What are the seeds in the first pic, Sue?

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    1. I was hoping no one would ask me that! Errm - possibly meadowsweet?

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  8. Those pumpkins look amazing! What kind of tool do your lot use Sue?

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    1. They use a thin serrated knife about 6 inches long for most of the cutting. Tom used my little paring knife which has a curved blade to make the lines around his pumpkin's eyes and to cut the skin off the teeth.

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  9. I love your pumpkins, though with a touch of envy. Couldn't find one to buy here in Spain - my children feel a little hard done by, despite trick or treating with great results! Halloween is 'celebrated' here in Spain too - but still no pumpkins - only plastic ones!! Glorious photos, Sue. Axxx

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  10. Lovely pumpkin-carving! No one came round the doors last night, the weather being so foul that even witches and goblins wouldn't have endured it. Good for forgetful people like me who forgot all about it and didn't have a single sugar-overdose item in the house....

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  11. Two questions, Sue: have you missed the quinces this year (all that lovely jam, jelly, cheese etc.)? and will you be producing a 2013 calendar please?

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    1. Isabelle, my quince tree failed this year -see this post . There will be an opportunity to win a 2013 calendar but I won't be selling any this year.

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  12. Thanks Sue, sorry to hear about the calendar, my 2012 calendar has been a delight. Will try to win a 2013 one then!
    I did read your post about the absent quinces and what I was wondering was, after so many seasons of quince abundance, and all the quince cooking you do each year, how has it felt not to do it this year? Has it been a relief not to be faced by a mountain of quinces or have you really missed them?
    Thanks for the posts and the recipes.

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    1. I'm sorry Isabelle I misread your comment as 'have I missed' not 'have you missed'. Interesting question. Yes, if I'm honest it has been a relief not to have 250 quinces to deal with, but I have missed not making jelly and quince vodka this year. Ideally a crop of between 30 and 50 would be about right for me. We shall see what next year brings.

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  13. Fantastic pumpkins - love the really evil middle one, the other two appear to be laughing nervously.

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    1. Ha! They do don't they?

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