September Sampler

Friday, 30 September 2011

Ode To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness!
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o'erbrimmed their clammy cells.

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers;
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cider-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings, hours by hours.

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, -
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing, and now with treble soft
The redbreast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies. 

John Keats, 19th September 1819

 I used to read a lot of Keats when I was younger. But now I find that reading Keats is a bit like eating a whole bowl of syllabub. I prefer plainer fare. That said, you can't beat his Ode To Autumn on a day like today. The last two lines of the first stanza are particularly apposite.


20 comments:

  1. Autumn? It's a heatwave!

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  2. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness...thank you. I now know that's from Keats and not just the cbeebies Autumn song.

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  3. Peppermint Creams - such a long time since I watched cbeebies. Looks likes I'm missing out!

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  4. Gorgeous pictures again Sue. No mists here I'm afraid but lots of fruitfulness.

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  5. Seems unreal that autumn will arrive whilst we wallow in the sunshine. Love Keats, always. Loving your colours in your sampler too.

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  6. My mother used to quote the first line, but tailed off a bit after that so thank you for the memory and for supplying the rest!

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  7. If Keats were looking out of the window today he may decide to tweak his poem a wee bit. Gorgeous jewel like colours in your sampler.

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  8. I have been thinking about that poem all week. Beautiful sampler - love the colours x

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  9. Lovely sampler Sue and I agree about Keats though it depends on the mood. x

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  10. I was more John Donne myself, I found the romantics a bit unattractive actually. Byron really was mad bad and dangerous to know. I appreciate them more these days it has to be said. Not Wordsworth though. I Prefer Coleridge. I had a recent encounter as my daughter had had an extended essay at university last year and I took the opportunity to get better acquainted. Wordsworth was definitely not our man of the moment and certainly induced a yawn or two. Keats poetry is rather pretty though.

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  11. I really like your photo sampler, such lovely colours.

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  12. Love the Keats and the pictures ....Thank you!

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  13. It was your samplers that first brought me to your blog - this is just as lovely as the others! Liz

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  14. That is one beautiful sampler.

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  15. A beautiful ode - though this week Autumn, phew! I'm still in Summer dresses, flip flops and making ice cream. Not that I'm complaining - at all.

    Nina x

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  16. Anonymous12:33 pm BST

    Beautiful poem. A nice reminder of my high school days.

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  17. I do enjoy your samplers. And Keats. But I'm not sure what he would have made of temps of 28 degrees yet darkish by 7.00 ... the vagaries of that wonderful thing 'the English weather'! I mean, how can this be October?!

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  18. That and Ode to a Nightingale are my two favourite Keats'. I pretentiously read them both whilst sitting under a tree in his garden in London many years ago. Gorgeous.

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  19. Autumn I think we may go straight into Winter!!

    Please may I refer back to "Give Me Strength" go to the end of my blog and see what is permanently parked at the station!
    Julie xxxxxxxx

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  20. Here it's all about fruitfulness and sweltering heat!

    Beside the vineyards there is a quince tree overhanging a public footpath. Do you think I could pick an apronful of quinces?

    I really want to make quince jelly!

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