Quince Harvest


A day of sparkling spiderwebs


Time to pick.





Two basketsful. At least three more basketsful still on the tree beyond my reach. Oh, how I hate to leave them but honestly what am I going to do with the 120 quinces I did manage to pick??
Most of my quince recipes require 4-5 quinces 'if you can get them'. That's about 30 recipes to get through then........... help! I wasn't joking when I said I'd be up to my nipples in quinces.


And that's not all of them.

Comments

  1. There will be no idle hands for you, that's for sure! Have a great week.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sell them at the gate, or sell your produce. Get the kids up the tree for the remainder. Sell sell sell!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's an idea Louise.I could print out some recipe too. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  4. oooh lovely. Do you live far???? xx

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have this image of you at your front gate completely naked, selling quinces to your neighbours and random passers-by. All very tasteful of course but naked!!! I don't even know what you look like really. but the image is there. Sorry if I've lowered the tone. Again. Ax

    ReplyDelete
  6. Not a good idea Mrs Bean. At all!

    ReplyDelete
  7. How about having a quince give-away draw! I'd enter it, would love to try to make (and eat) some quince jelly...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well I do think that is a jolly good idea. But..... I'm just a bit worried about the postage costs. It would be lovely to offer several parcels of quinces. Hmmm I'm going to have to think about that one.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sue, what about trying to sell your surplus to the local farm shop that you tell us about? Quinces are quite rarified perhaps they would be interested - good luck

    Best wishes

    Cxx

    ReplyDelete
  10. Claire, I think that is what I will do. I asked a couple of years ago at my favourite farm shop and they said they would take them. However when I picked them they had little brown spots throughout the flesh.They were fine to cook with but I thought they wouldn't sell so I didn't take them to the shop.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Did you brave all those spiders webs, I would have been knocking them down with a broom, I HATE spiders! What a harvest! hope you have luck selling them to the farmshop!

    ReplyDelete
  12. OOh quinces..i'm so envious..i love quince jam and jelly..can't find any round here for love nor money...i was out too with my girls taking pics of spiderwebs in the mist with the dew shining all over them..it was a pleasure to show the girls how they sparkled...sell the quinces..i would buy them with brown spots on...
    take care
    sara

    ReplyDelete
  13. I know I've said this before, but I do so wish I had a quince tree. Looking forward to seeing some of your creations, you lucky thing.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I've been waiting to see when you picked your quinces to know when to pick mine. It's the first year my tree has produced any - it's about 4 years old - and this year there are loads. Having waited a long time for this moment, I'm not now sure what to do with them. Please share your favourite recipes - I'm particularly interested in one for membrillo - that Spanish quince paste which is sold in tiny quantities for large amounts.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Yes I'm with the girls, sell, sell, sell, it doesn't matter if they have little brown spots, most organic produce have blemishes.
    What a beautiful day to pick, the sun shining. I love the dew on spiderwebs, in my (married) home I could look out the bedroom window to all the trees and watch the spiderwebs twinkle in the sun after the rain. We lived in a bush setting, was very lucky.
    Happy cooking, Sandi xx

    ReplyDelete
  16. Quince jelly/paste to go with cheese is fabulous, and it's really quite expensive to buy. I bet there's loads of people who would love to buy your quinces............... an honesty box at your garden gate, would that be the ticket? Love Vanessa xxx

    ReplyDelete
  17. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  18. pati from London2:01 pm BST

    I love quince.... In spain we have it cooked as a thick paste (membrillo) and we eat it with a very nice soft cheese (Burgos cheese) and walnuts and it is delicious....mmm...mmm...
    I haven't had it for ages!!! Also quince jam is soooo tasty... I wish I had a quince tree in my garden! Whatever you end up doing, enjoy them!! Pati from London x

    ReplyDelete
  19. Ooh! I picked my five today. Mine are really tiny though, which makes me wonder if they're actually something unquincey and deadly poisonous. Oops. Hahaha!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I've been waiting with much anticipation as I expect many of your other readers have, to the day you harvest your quinces.

    What an abundance there is!

    Like the others I think you should try to sell them, or as Vanessa suggested an honesty box at your front gate maybe?

    Here's a thought - what about having a giveaway of your final product, a jar of quince jelly!

    I know I'd enter as I've never tasted quince jelly, in fact I've never tasted quince fullstop!

    AdeY x

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wow, what a bountiful harvest. You are going to be very busy!:) Pj x

    ReplyDelete
  22. Wonderful crop, I'm sure the local farm shop would love to have some to sell.

    ReplyDelete
  23. If you lose the will to live, would it be worth putting them at the garden gate with an honesty box? And maybe a recipe on a sheet. Better still, contact your WI and offer to demonstrate to them, you might even get paid!

    ReplyDelete
  24. just picking our first harvest of quince - but once cut open they are turning brown inside - does it mean they are over ripe. Would you still use them to cook with?- in the process of using Hugh's squash chutney which has quince in the recipe

    ReplyDelete
  25. Fran, I'm sorry not to reply earlier, I've only just noticed your comment.

    Quinces turn orangey-brown almost immediately when you cut them. The brown disappears when cooked.
    Also they are often quite dark brown inside, like a bruise. I think it is a sign of age because as I work my way through my harvest the browness is more apparent. They still seem fine to cook with though and I just carry on regardless of colour.

    Sue x

    ReplyDelete
  26. To think I pay the equivalent of a couple of quid a fruit when they're in season! What a bounty. I planted a tree last autumn, but I guess it's asking too much to get anything this year. How old is your tree, do you know?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it had been planted three years before it fruited. It produced just one fruit and then the year after that about a dozen and the year after that fifty odd. Since then it produces 200-300.

      Delete
  27. Anonymous6:48 am BST

    I have a smyrna quince in our garden, which we planted 5 years ago, and the harvest last year and promised again this year is incredibly bountiful! Made lots of quince things but the best was a quince apple butter that is amazing! 3/4 quince to 1/4 apple (or 2/3 to 1/3) and hours/days of cooking down into the most delish thick fruit butter! Cooked/stewed the quince first on the stove top and when near done added the apples and then placed the combined mixture into several slow cookers/electric and cooked them w/the top off for about 24-36 hours, stirring during waking hours (mine), adding the sugar and spices toward the end (lots of ginger, a natural w/quince, and cinnamon, a few others), and then poured it into a huge black cast-iron skillet, placed in a low oven and stirred every 1/2 hour or so for a few hours until thick and dark/reddish (mahogany) and it is amazing!!!! Canned it, in a hot water bath. Great on toast or in yoghurt or kefir or by the spoonful. love quince. thanks for your blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I only wish I could try this. Hopefully next year my quince tree won't fail me as it has this year, and I'll be able to try it then. thank you for the recipe.

      Delete
    2. I discovered you can make great "butter" (I made pear, will try apple too) by using the crock pot/slow cooker. Get the fruit ready in little chunks, can't remember if I heated at all first, then instead of cooking and stirring all day on the stove, putthe fruit in the slow cooker. Put a wooden spoon across the top or sit lid kitty-corner to allow steam to escape. Then let cook down all night. You don't have to stir and it doesn't stick and burn. I got up in the morning to hot pear butter ready to can! It was wonderful!!

      Delete
  28. Have over supply of quince, live in SE London, if anyone wants any?

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment